Frank Lloyd

Frank Lloyd – Berkeley Square (1933)

Leslie Howards time-travels between 1784 and 1933 London in this fantasy romance. Read More »

George Fitzmaurice & Frank Lloyd – Lilac Time (1928)

All of those handsome young men in their flying machines are billeted in a field next to the Widow Berthelot’s farmhouse in France. Her daughter Jeannine is curious about the young men fighting for England in World War I and their airplanes. Then one of the aviators is killed. His replacement is Captain Philip Blythe who can’t help but notice Jeannine. When he lands the first time, she is standing in the middle of his “runway.” She makes a more favorable impression when he sees her later by the lilacs. When all of the young men depart on a mission, Blythe promises to return. Read More »

Frank Lloyd – The Last Command (1955)

It’s 1834. Texas is being strangled by the tyrannical military rule of General Santa Anna (J. Carrol Naish, Canadian Pacific), Mexico’s power-mad president. When frontier hero Jim Bowie (Sterling Hayden, Naked Alibi) returns to his besieged homeland, he finds the embittered Texans plotting rebellion against his old friend Santa Anna. When Santa Anna’s cruel grip tightens around his fellow Texans, Bowie soon realizes he must side against the Mexican despot. Commanding a ragtag regiment of frontier fighters, Bowie prepares to make a final stand at the famed Fort Alamo against superior forces. Though they are all doomed to die, the outnumbered Texan defenders fight heroically for freedom in one of the fiercest and bloodiest battles in American history. Read More »

Frank Lloyd – The Shanghai Story (1954)

Gary Tooze writes:
Produced and directed by the prestigious Frank Lloyd, The Shanghai Story was promoted as a “class” production by the bread-and-butter firm of Republic Pictures. The film takes place in the eponymous far-eastern metropolis (courtesy of the Republic backlot), where Communist police chief Colonel Zorek (Marvin Miller) hopes to trap an American spy. Zorek rounds up the usual suspects and sequesters them in a seedy hotel. Could the spy be Dan Maynard (Edmond O’Brien), a cynical doctor? Is it munitions profiteer Ricki Dolmine (Barry Kelley)? Perhaps it’s two-fisted mercenary seaman Knuckles Greer (Richard Jaeckel). Orrrrrrr, maybe it’s the mysterious Rita King (Ruth Roman), who is inexplicably given permission to come and go as she pleases by the otherwise intractable Zorek. True to form, this Republic A-picture resolves its problems with a final reel of good old B-flick action and violence. Read More »