Hana Makhmalbaf

Hana Makhmalbaf – Ruzha-ye Sabz AKA Green Days (2009)

Ava, an Iranian woman suffering from depression, blames recent political events in Iran for her troubled mental state and goes to a psychologist. The psychologist advises her to take on physical work, and later, to work on a play. However, the play, inspired by the reality and problems of her society, is banned. It is election time. The city is alive with possibilities. A new wave of hope has sent people massing into the streets to participate, to vote against the current president. Everywhere there is singing, dancing, action— a vibrant, passionate vision of a very different future for her country. But Ava still doesn’t believe change will come. She leaves her home and talks to people in the streets, trying desperately to rekindle her own hope.

The film is part documentary, part fiction. Read More »

Hana Makhmalbaf – Lezate divanegi AKA Joy of Madness (2003)

Quote:
Shot on a digital video camera by the then 14-year-old Hana Makhmalbaf, Joy Of Madness is, in the words of its precociously talented young director, “a documentary on the surface but a feature film in essence.”
Partly it’s an idiosyncratic account of Hana’s elder sister Samira attempting to cast her own film, At Five In The Afternoon, with non-professionals in war-scarred Kabul in autumn 2002. It’s also a revealing portrait of a shattered society still traumatised by its experiences under the terrifying rule of the Taliban. Read More »