Juraj Jakubisko

Juraj Jakubisko – Perinbaba aka The Feather Fairy (1985)

A 1985 adaptation of the Brothers Grimm’s Mother Hulda short story directed by Slovak director Juraj Jakubisko. A fairy tale about a grandma who cares for snow and a boy who isn’t afraid of death. Read More »

Juraj Jakubisko – Nevera po slovensky AKA Infidelity the Slovak Way (1981)

Jakubisko’s comedy about infidelity inside the community of lumberjacks in three chapters. First, Group of men gets to know that there comes a group of female brigadiers to a near village and tries to seduce them, which won’t come out as precisely as they wanted. In the next chapter, one girl got pregnant and lumberjacks tries to solve this by a wedding to a man called Domino. In the final phase, they’re struggling for the succesful wedding and are affraid of possible punishment from their wives. Read More »

Juraj Jakubisko – Kristove roky AKA The Crucial Years (1967)

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Jakubiskos debut, by many considered his best movie. The title can be translated as “The Crucial Years”, but literally it is “The Christ Years”, based on the idiomatic notion that a man should accomplish something in life before he reaches the age of Jesus when he was crucified. The film surely has some autobiographical elements, as it is about a beginning artist from Eastern Slovakia who lives and works in Prague. Read More »

Juraj Jakubisko – Vtáckovia, siroty a blázni AKA Birds, Orphans and Fools (1969)

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Slovak director Juraj Jakubisko is often described as the Fellini of Eastern Europe. After the 1968 film The Deserter and the Nomads, he was put in exile in Czechoslovakia after the soviet invasion. With cooperation from a Paris film studio he made this film. Birds Orphans and Fools is a brilliant, surreal and underrated tragic comedy that not many people seem to know about. The story is about three orphans who have lost their families in war. Although the two men Andrej and Yorick and the lady Marta are adults, they act foolish like children trying to live life to the fullest. They resort with their landlord and other orphans in an apartment that is distorted with various shelves, cupboards and animals scattered about. But the main characters can’t block out the pain of living in a war torn country, and after Yorick is put in prison and returns a year later, things will never be the same. Towards the end the climax becomes maybe one of the most tragic in cinema history. This was the first film in Jakubisko’s trilogy of Happiness. If you enjoyed Jodorowsky’s Fando & Lis or Vera Chytilova’s Daisies, you have to see this film. Read More »