Kinji Fukasaku

Kinji Fukasaku – Gyangu tai G-men AKA Gang Vs G-men (1962)

Quote:
The young Sonny Chiba is fabulous in this wildly entertaining Kinji Fukasaku film. It’s the 4th movie in the very loosely related Gang series. This instalment sees former gangster (Koji Tsuruta) brought back to action when the police needs his help to bring down a dangerous gang lead by Tetsuro Tamba. Chiba plays an enthusiastic young man who goes undercover even though it’s obviously more than he can handle. Critic Mark Schilling aptly described his character as “the seventh samurai” of this story. Though not an all time classic like some of Fukasaku’s later movies, it’s a very stylish and entertaining film full of 1960s cool. Chiba, bursting with youthful charm and energy, is the film’s biggest asset. This is one of his best performances, often leaving superstars like Tamba and Tsuruta in his shadow, and marked the beginning of his best era as an actor. Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Hakuchu no buraikan AKA Greed in Broad Daylight (1961)

Synopsis:
‘Aided by a gang that includes two Americans and a Korean, Miyahara attacks an armoured truck transporting money to a US army base. But soon the cronies fall out – with the settling of old scores, jealousy and murder leading all the characters to a tragic end.’
– BFI Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Funky Hat no kaidanji: Nisenman-en no ude aka Hepcat in the Funky Hat: The Case of the 2,000,000 Yen Arm (1961)

Shinichi “Sonny” Chiba returns as the reckless son of a private detective takes on the case of a minor league baseball pitcher who disappears right before signing a contract into the major leagues. Meanwhile, the body of an orthopedist is discovered in the river. Two cases come into play and are finally connected into one case. A sequel created by Director Kinji Fukasaku and Superstar Shinichi “Sonny” Chiba, chock full of action and refreshing laughter that will satisfy any audience! Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Funky Hat no kaidanji AKA Hepcat In The Funky Hat (1961)

Ichiro (Chiba) is a scrappy little sport in a big car and funny hat always looking for some fun and some extra cash on the side. He and his friends get themselves involved in some shady business dealings involving a kidnapping. Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Jakoman to Tetsu aka One-eyed Captain and Tetsu (1964)

Plot:
In a village subsisting on its herring fishery, a one-eyed criminal named Jakoman terrorizes the inhabitants. One of them, the son of the head of one of the fish companies by the name of Tetsu, decides to overthrow Jakoman and his cohorts.

(Remake of a 1949 movie of the same name directed by Senkichi Taniguchi written by Akira Kurosawa and starring Toshirô Mifune) Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Kataku no hito AKA House on Fire (1986)

Adapted from the autobiographical story by Kazuo Dan which was published a few months before his death, House Of Fire tells story of a popular writer sharing his complicated life with his family, his numerous mistresses and his work. Read More »

Kinji Fukasaku – Kamata kôshinkyoku AKA Fall Guy (1982)

Kamata kôshinkyoku (1982)
Quote:
The English title Fall Guy is fitting – this is a film about a stuntman who takes several plunges for his movie star friend – but there’s a clever touch of subversion in the less obvious Japanese title. Kamata Koshin-Kyoku refers to Shochiku studio’s theme song. But this film about the production of a samurai epic on the Toei studio lot in Kyoto is hardly a fawning tribute to the world of cinema. It’s a film by Kinji Fukasaku. Like the director’s masterpiece, Battles Without Honor and Humanity, Fall Guy exposes the injustices visited on honest, hard-working men serving corrupt and undeserving bosses; all he has done is change the setting. In the place of low-ranking yakuza are stuntmen, the foot soldiers of the entertainment industry. In the place of Japan’s criminal underground is a movie set. Read More »