Lav Diaz

Lav Diaz – Siglo ng pagluluwal AKA Century of Birthing (2011)

An artist struggles to finish his work. A storyline about a cult plays in his head. Fundamentalism will destroy the world. The artist destroys his muse in the process. He redeems her in the end. Read More »

Lav Diaz – Ang babaeng humayo AKA The Woman Who Left (2016)

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After spending the last 30 years in prison, Horacia is immediately released when someone else confessed to the crime. Still overwhelmed by her new freedom, she comes to the painful realization that her aristocratic former lover had set her up. As kidnappings targeting the wealthy begin to proliferate, Horacia sees the opportunity to plot her revenge. Read More »

Philippe Grandrieux & Lav Diaz & Manuela De Laborde & Óscar Enríquez – Liminal (2020)

A FICUNAM commission for four directors, Liminal seeks to play with poetic affinities between film and music. Moving across aesthetic and generational differences, the film-makers explore this relationship through four distinct stories as to context and imaginary.

Within the category of world cinéma d’auteur, Philippe Grandrieux and Lav Diaz have much in common in terms of their affinities with radical cinematographic form: both are extremely inventive in their practical relationship between music and narration. Read More »

Lav Diaz – Ebolusyon ng isang pamilyang Pilipino AKA Evolution of a Filipino Family (2004)

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An especially long film. And a special long film. An even more special detail is that, while watching it, the film gives you an inevitable feeling that it should last exactly this long, if not longer. The manner of production is also noteworthy. The film was shot bit by bit over a period of nine years, first on film and more recently on video. It is a method of shooting that was partly necessitated by financial considerations, but that also fits in well with the epic story that extends over a period of more than fifteen years. The film spans the Marcos regime’s state of siege in the Philippines (1971-1987). As the title indicates, Diaz follows the adventures of a family against the backdrop of the social and political developments in this crucial period in history. Read More »

Lav Diaz – Walang Alaala ang mga Paru-paro aka Butterflies Have No Memories [Director’s Cut] (2009)

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Diaz’s contribution to the 2009 Jeonju Digital Project.

Canadian Martha (Lois Goff) returns to the site of her Filipino upbringing, now a depressed ex-mining town. Her childhood friend Willy (Willy Fernandez) still carries something of a torch for her, but the bitter, ambitious Mang Ferding (Dante Perez) soon thrusts him into a test of loyalties. Read More »

Lav Diaz – Lahi, Hayop AKA Genus Pan (2020)

Taking leave from their jobs at a gold mine, three workers journey to their home village on foot through the spectacular yet unforgiving wilderness of the mythical island of Hugaw. As time passes and their conversations intensify, buried histories emerge and a sense of psychosis invades the scene. As ever, Lav Diaz’s exquisitely subdued black-and-white images and patient rhythm lend a Brechtian register to the drama; almost always filmed from the same fixed distance, each scene is an immaculate tableau vivant. Behind the film’s folkloric façade, Diaz once again taps into the collective memory of defiant struggles against the tyranny of both contemporary Filipino society and colonial brutality, centred on the timeless image of men walking – one of the key traits of Pan. (Hyun Jin Cho, BFI) Read More »

Lav Diaz & Brillante Mendoza & Kidlat Tahimik – Lakbayan (2018)

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Lakbayan (Journey) is an omnibus film that consists of Brillante Mendoza’s Desfocado (Defocused), Lav Diaz’s Hugaw (Dirt) and National Artis for Film Kidlat Tahimik’s Lakaran Ni Kabunyan (Kabunyan’s Journey).

It tells three tales of the Filipino journey. An unemployed cameraman joins a protest march of farmers asking the government to help them reclaim their ancestral land stolen by the powerful in Desfocado. In Hugaw, it is also the powerful that controls an island where a young miner contests the problems and the status quo. A mosaic artist is empowered as he arrives at his destination while traveling from island to island in Lakaran Ni Kabunyan. Read More »