Lynne Sachs

Lynne Sachs – Figure and I (2021)

Quote:
“Kristine Leschper wrote to me with a very intriguing proposition: create a short film in response to her song “Figure and I”. I knew that this deeply rhythmic two-minute song needed some kind of somatic imagery. I needed to move with my body and my camera as I was shooting it. A few days later, I went to “The New Woman Behind the Camera” exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. In this show, I saw two photos by two women photographers from the 1920s whose work I had never seen before. These images guided me to a way of interpreting the physicality and the intimacy of Kristine’s song. Soon afterward, I invited my friend Kim Wilberforce to be in my film and to interpret the song herself, through her vibrant wardrobe and her precise, ecstatic clapping gestures. “
—Lynne Sachs Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Lynne Sachs: Exploring Women, Culture, Science & Myth (2005)

This DVD collection presents two of Lynne Sachs’ earlier films with several more recent media works — all of which explore themes of women, culture, science & myth. The creative as well as intellectual inner workings of these projects are revealed for the first time in the context of an elaborately conceived, yet accessible disc.

BIOGRAPHY OF LILITH (35minutes) updates the creation myth by telling the story of the first woman and for some, the first feminist. In conjunction with the film, the DVD offers a personal introduction to Jewish Kabbala. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Which Way Is East (1994)

When two American sisters travel north from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi, conversations with Vietnamese strangers and friends reveal to them the flip side of a shared history. Lynne and Dana Sachs’ travel diary of their trip to Vietnam is a collection of tourism, city life, culture clash, and historic inquiry that’s put together with the warmth of a quilt. Which Way Is East starts as a road trip and flowers into a political discourse. It combines Vietnamese parables, history and memories of the people the sisters met, as well as their own childhood memories of the war on TV. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Still Life with Woman and Four Objects (1986)

The film portrait falls somewhere between a painting and a prose poem. Sachs looks at a fictional woman’s daily routines and thoughts. By interweaving threads of history and fiction, the film becomes a tribute to a real woman: Emma Goldman. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Drawn and Quartered (1987)

Lynne and her friend John shot this film with a Regular 8 camera on a roof in San Francisco, literally creating a “drawn and quartered” image. Mostly, they each exist in their own private domains, separated by the barrier of the film frame. Sometimes, however, one person dares to intrude upon the pictorial space of the other. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Film About a Father Who (2020)

Quote:
Over a period of 35 years between 1984 and 2019, Lynne Sachs recorded 8mm and 16mm film, analogue videotape, and digital images of her father, Ira Sachs Sr., a bon vivant and pioneering businessman from Park City, Utah. Ostensibly a documentary portrait of a parent, Film About a Father Who . . . reveals as much, or more, about patriarchal silences and omissions than about the subject himself, who remains enigmatic throughout. “My father has always chosen the alternative path in life, a path that has brought unpredictable adventures, nine children with six different women, brushes with the police, and a life-long interest in trying to do some good in the world.” It is also a film about the complex dynamics that conspire to create a family. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – The Last Happy Day (2009)

To mark her 50th birthday, filmmaker Lynne Sachs gathers a group of her contemporaries—all New Yorkers but originally hailing from all corners of the globe—for a weekend of recollection and reflection on the most life-altering personal, local, and international events of the past half- century, creating what Sachs calls “a collective distillation of our times.” Interspersed with poetry and flashes of archival footage, this poignant reverie reveals how far beyond our control life is, and how far we can go despite this. Read More »