Netherlands

Charles Huguenot van der Linden & Heinz Josephson – Nederlands in zeven lessen AKA Dutch in Seven Lessons (1948)

A cameraman is given a week to photograph the aerial highlights of Holland for a travelogue.
Read More »

Fiona Tan – Ascent (2016)

Through a gray blanket of cloud the contours of a mountain can be barely discerned. This is Mount Fuji, a volcano with many faces and of immeasurable cultural and symbolic significance. We are lead through the film by the voices of two fictitious characters – Mary, an English woman and her deceased Japanese partner, Hiroshi. Mary receives a parcel containing letters and a collection of photographs from Hiroshi. His letters, in which he describes climbing Mount Fuji, trigger in her mind a train of thoughts and reflections. The photographs we discover together with Mary. 4,500 exceptional and diverse photographs from the past 150 years form the basis for this film. Many images are of undeniably breathtaking beauty – ranging from early examples of nineteenth century Japanese studio photography to military propaganda photos from the thirties, from victorious American press images to amateur snapshots across several decades. Read More »

Peter Holland – De vier dochters Bennet AKA Pride and prejudice (1961)

IMDB:
Mr. and Mrs. Bennet have five unmarried daughters, and Mrs. Bennet is especially eager to find suitable husbands for them. When the rich single gentlemen Mr. Bingley and Mr. Darcy come to live nearby, the Bennets have high hopes. But pride, prejudice, and misunderstandings all combine to complicate their relationships and to make happiness difficult. Read More »

Fiona Tan – News from the Near Future (2003)

Amsterdam-based photographer and video artist Fiona Tan (born 1966) has been a central figure on the contemporary art scene since the 1990s. In her video News from the Near Future (2003) a collage of historic film and audio material tells of man’s ambivalent relationship with water as a force of nature. Drawing on the archives of the Amsterdam Film Museum, Tan composed a narrative crescendo starting off with idyllic impressions of the watery world and building to increasingly menacing scenarios of an unleashed nature. Images of floods and churning seas, of wild winds and storms, parade before our eyes the destructive force of water. Tragedies at sea are reported in the style of old newsreels or radio shows, segueing into pictures of flooded cities that – as indicated in the work’s title – forebode future catastrophes. The cinematic repertoire of waves, tides and floods acts as an historical memory, presenting the sea as a metaphor for the flow of time. Read More »

Alex van Warmerdam – Nr. 10 (2021)

Plot: Günter, found in a German forest as a four-year old, grows up in a foster family. Four decades later, he leads a normal life: he earns a living as a stage actor, spends time with his daughter Lizzy, and has an affair with a married woman. He doesn’t start wondering about his origins until a stranger on a bridge whispers a single word in his ear. Read More »

Frans Zwartjes – It’s Me (1976)

Quote:
First full-length experimental feature by filmmaker Zwartjes about an actress, played by Willeke van Ammelrooy, who during the whole film, in continuously changes moods, is busy in her room. Eventually, she is made an offer by telephone. But what offer does the actress get? – letterboxd.com

Willeke van Ammelrooy stars in this acting tour de force, never leaving the screen for an instant. The movie follows her in her role as an actress who is trying to decide whether or not to accept a certain role. While she is worrying at the problem, she smokes, bathes, dresses, has a tantrum or two, makes phone calls, and cleans her room. – by Clarke Fountain, allmovie.com Read More »

Robin Lutz – Escher: Het Oneindige Zoeken AKA M.C. Escher – Journey to Infinity (2018)

Feature documentary about the life and work of MC Escher.

Letterboxd review
★★★★ Watched by NotASexyVamp 17 Feb 2019

After a slow start, this becomes a seriously satisfying film about a great artist. Escher considered his work “a search for the endless” and this film argues he achieved that. By using the tools of cinema to bring his art to life, we can discover the way it operates, the nuanced construction behind it. By using Escher’s own words (brought to life by Stephen Fry), we see his view on his work. Awe-inspiring. Read More »