Patricio Guzmán

Patricio Guzmán – La cordillère des songes AKA The Cordillera of Dreams (2019)

Quote:
Winner of the Best Documentary award at the Cannes Film Festival, master filmmaker Patricio Guzmán’s The Cordillera of Dreams completes his trilogy (with Nostalgia for the Light and The Pearl Button) investigating the relationship between historical memory, political trauma, and geography in his native country of Chile. It centers on the imposing landscape of the Andes that run the length of the country’s Eastern border. At once protective and isolating, magisterial and indifferent, the Cordillera serves as an enigmatic focal point around which Guzmán contemplates the enduring legacy of the 1973 military coup d’état. Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – Le Cas Pinochet AKA The Pinochet Case (2001)

Synopsis
On Tuesday, September 22, 1998, General Augusto Pinochet flew to London on a pleasure trip. He rested for a few days. He had tea with Margaret Thatcher. He had every intention of visiting Paris. But, suddenly, he began experiencing back pain and underwent an operation in the London Clinic. Upon waking from surgery, he was arrested by the police. Who was responsible for this ? Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – La cordillère des songes AKA The Cordillera of Dreams (2019)

Quote:Winner of the Best Documentary award at the Cannes Film Festival, master filmmaker Patricio Guzmán’s The Cordillera of Dreams completes his trilogy (with Nostalgia for the Light and The Pearl Button) investigating the relationship between historical memory, political trauma, and geography in his native country of Chile. It centers on the imposing landscape of the Andes that run the length of the country’s Eastern border. At once protective and isolating, magisterial and indifferent, the Cordillera serves as an enigmatic focal point around which Guzmán contemplates the enduring legacy of the 1973 military coup d’état. Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – En nombre de Dios (1987)

Documentary that explores the rol of the Chilean Catholic Church in the fight against Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorial regime, giving great emphasis to the creation of the Vicaría of the Solidarity and the protests against the violations to the human rights. The film won festival prizes and was shown on European television. Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – La cruz del Sur AKA The Southern Cross (1992)

Quote:
This overview of popular religiosity in Latin America journeys from pre-Colombian myths to liberation theology. “A sure synthesis of fiction and documentary. It’s a voice of voices: a space for an encounter of American diversity, which helps us to recognize ourselves as fingers on the same hand.” Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – El Botón de Nácar AKA The Pearl Button (2015)

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Synopsis
The ocean contains the history of all humanity. The sea holds all the voices of the earth and those that come from outer space. Water receives impetus from the stars and transmits it to living creatures. Water, the longest border in Chile, also holds the secret of two mysterious buttons which were found on its ocean floor. Chile, with its 2,670 miles of coastline and the largest archipelago in the world, presents a supernatural landscape. In it are volcanoes, mountains and glaciers. In it are the voices of the Patagonian Indigenous people, the first English sailors and also those of its political prisoners. Some say that water has memory. This film shows that it also has a voice. Read More »

Patricio Guzmán – Chile, la memoria obstinada AKA Chile, the Obstinate Memory (1997)

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(Chicago reader capsule ) :
“Released in three parts, Patricio Guzman’s epic documentary The Battle of Chile (1975-’79) captured such critical events as the bombing of the presidential palace during the 1973 military coup, but it wasn’t screened in Chile until the 1990s. That belated premiere inspired Guzman to make this 1997 documentary, in which clips from the earlier film are threaded among interviews and powerful sequences showing the reactions of Chilean viewers. Whereas The Battle of Chile uses voice-over narration to summarize its on-the-spot footage, manipulated only minimally by editing, Chile, Obstinate Memory is more expansive. Without ignoring or hyperbolizing the way politics affects our sense of the past, it presents many galvanizing moments; at one point a viewer who was a child during the coup shamefacedly recalls his pleasure at being allowed to stay home from school” Read More »