Silent

D.W. Griffith – A Corner in Wheat (1909)

An unscrupulous and greedy capitalist speculator decides to corner the wheat market for his own profit, establishing complete control over the markets. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – The Sealed Room (1909)

A king exacts vengeance upon his faithless mistress and her lover. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – Those Awful Hats (1909)

Set in an early cinema house, this comic short illustrates the problems with the gals’ hats obscuring the movie patron’s line of vision. Read More »

Jean Epstein – Sa tête (1929)

Quote:
Jean Bernard, industrial designer, is an only child and has lost his father. He is in love with Blanche Dumas, secretary to a bank manager. One day, he visits his mother who lives in the small village of Livilliers and spends the night there. The next morning, police arrive to arrest him. His mother does not understand what he is accused of and will discover that he would have murdered the banker who was making advances to Blanche. Read More »

Vladimir Barsky – Bela (1927)

Quote:
A drama based on a chapter of Lermontov’s novel “A Hero of Our Time”.

Pechorin serves in a remote fortress. One day in a neighbouring village he meets Bela, the daughter of a local prince, at a wedding. With the help of her brother Azamat, Pechorin takes the girl to the fortress. In return he gives Azamat a horse, which he steals from the highwayman Kazbich. Pechorin’s infatuation soon subsides, and he now spends more and more time hunting. Read More »

Marcel Carné & Michel Sanvoisin – Nogent, Eldorado du dimanche (1929)

IMDB Review wrote:
Seven years before his first feature-length film “Jenny” ,Carné already displayed the populisme,the command of the picture and the brilliance which would mark his golden era (1936-1946) .With hindsight,it is pity that ,for lack of money,he could not make his final film ,”Mouche” from Guy de Maupassant , which would have taken place down by the Marne ,and which might perhaps have returned him to former glories. Read More »

Stuart Paton – 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916)

Stuart Paton’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916) is an epic retelling of Jules Verne’s classic novel, shot on location in the Bahaman Islands. Allen Holubar stars as the domineering Captain Nemo, who rescues the passengers of an American naval vessel after ramming them with his iron-clad, steampunk submarine, The Nautilus. Incorporating material from Verne’s Mysterious Island, the film also follows the adventures of a group of Civil War soldiers whose hot-air balloon crash lands on an exotic island, where they encounter the untamed “Child of Nature” (Jane Gail). Calling itself “The First Submarine Photoplay Ever Filmed,” the film is highlighted by stunning underwater photography (engineered by Ernest and George Williamson), including an underwater funeral and a deep sea diver’s battle with a giant cephalopod. In honor of the film’s extraordinary technical and artistic achievement, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea was added to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. Read More »