Spanish cinema under Franco

Amando de Ossorio – El buque maldito aka The Ghost Galleon (1974)

Two young girls travel in a newly constructed boat at sea. This event should make a propaganda for this new construction. The wireless radio contact breaks suddenly. The search expedition comes across an old sail ship populated by bloody zombies. It seems there is no escape from the undead templars… Read More »

Amando de Ossorio – La noche de las gaviotas aka Night of the Seagulls (1975)

The Knight Templars return in this fourth installment of the Blind Dead seris. On this outing, the Templars haunt a fishing village, where they rise seven nights every seven years to claim their sacrificial offerings in return for the safety of the townspeople. Read More »

Carlos Saura – La madriguera AKA Honeycomb (1969)

Synopsis:
‘Teresa and Pedro have been married for five years and are settled in a routine, and a rather sterile home. He manages – and possibly owns – a factory, while she is a lady of leisure. The arrival of a collection of furniture from Teresa’s childhood family home triggers a nightmare and subsequent sleepwalking, followed by regressive and childish behaviour. Teresa replaces their furniture (in keeping with the modern – verging on Brutalist – architecture of their house) with what has arrived, which is distinctly different in style (dark wood and richly coloured fabrics). The film then settles into a series of extended role play ‘games’ between husband and wife that gradually get out of hand.’
– Rebecca Naughten Read More »

Rafael Gil – Don Quijote de la Mancha (1947)

Quote:
The first sound film version in Spanish of the great classic novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. A huge undertaking for Spanish cinema in its day, it was the longest film version of the novel up to that time, and very likely the most faithful, reverently following the book in its dialogue and order of episodes. Read More »

Carlos Saura – La Caza AKA The Hunt (1966)

Quote:
Museo Valenciano de la Ilustración y la Modernidad writes:
José, Paco and Luis, three middle-aged men who fought in the “national” side during the Spanish Civil War, meet in a village of Castilla to hunt rabbits, accompanied by young Enrique. But the hunting journey will stir up deep latent frustrations and rancours within the group. La Caza, which won the Silver Bear for the Best director in Berlin, was compared by critics with the most avant-garde films of that period. It had a remarkable influence on directors such as Sam Peckinpah, who found in this film a source of stylistic and thematic inspiration. Read More »

Richard Lester – The Four Musketeers (1974)

Synopsis:
D’Artagnan has become a Musketeer. Protestants hold La Rochelle, and the Queen loves Buckingham, who’ll soon send ships to support the rebels. Richelieu enlists Rochefort to kidnap Constance, the Queen’s go-between and D’Artagnan’s love. The Cardinal uses the wily, amoral Milady de Winter to distract D’Artagnan. But soon, she is D’Artagnan’s sworn enemy, and she has an unfortunate history with Athos as well. Milady goes to England to dispatch Buckingham; the Musketeers fight the rebels. Milady, with Rochefort’s help, then turns to her personal agenda. Can D’Artagnan save Constance, defeat Rochefort, slip de Winter’s ire, and stay free of the Cardinal? All for one, one for all. Read More »

Jorge Grau – Non si deve profanare il sonno dei morti AKA The Living Dead at Manchester Morgue AKA Let Sleeping Corpses Lie (1974)

Synopsis:
A cop chases two young people visiting the English countryside, suspecting them of a local murder; unbeknownst to him, the real culprits are the living dead, brought to life with a thirst for human flesh by radiation being used by area farmers as a pesticide alternative. Read More »