Spanish cinema under Franco

Juan Antonio Bardem – La corrupción de Chris Miller AKA The Corruption of Chris Miller (1973)

Quote:

In a mansion out in the middle of the country, Ruth lives with her strange stepdaughter Chris. They have a somewhat unusual, codependent relationship, and are waiting for the return of Chris’s father, who abruptly abandoned them some time ago. Chris has additional problems – she was raped while in the shower at school and has violent flashbacks whenever it rains, during which she blacks out and stabs anything in front of her. A handsome drifter comes to stay with them and at first seduces Ruth, but then begins to fall for Chris. Meanwhile, a killer is roaming the countryside and slaughters a retired dancer and an entire family. Could the drifter be responsible? Read More »

Edgar Neville – Domingo de carnaval AKA Carnival Sunday (1945)

The same morning that carnival begins, a serene finds in Madrid the corpse of a rich and greedy lender who has been murdered. The main suspect is a seller of watches that owed much money ​​to the old woman, but her daughter, not content with the arrest of his father, begins to investigate on their own … Read More »

Eloy de la Iglesia – La semana del asesino AKA The Cannibal Man (1972)

A young man, Marco, working as a butcher, accidentally kills a taxi driver. His girlfriend Paula wants to go to the police so he has to kill her too. He then has to kill his brother, his brother’s fiancée and his father, who have become suspicious. He gets rid of the bodies by taking them to a slaughterhouse. Read More »

Juan Antonio Bardem – Muerte de un ciclista AKA Death of a Cyclist (1955)

Synopsis:
A couple traveling through the countryside strike a man on a bicycle. When they get out of their car to examine him, they find that he is injured but not dead. But instead of helping the man, Juan (Alberto Closas) and Maria Jose (Lucia Bosé) do the unthinkable. They flee – rather than reveal that they have been carrying on a long-term affair.

When they return to Madrid, the couple pay a terrible price for their deception. Guilt begins to gnaw away at them, especially at Juan, who is also experiencing conflict with his young students over an ethical issue at the university where he teaches… Read More »

Eloy de la Iglesia – Nadie oyó gritar AKA No One Heard the Scream (1973)

“No One Heard the Scream” is another terrific Spanish horror film from the troubled director Eloy de la Iglesia. The film stars two of his strongest performers, Carmen Sevilla (from de la Iglesia’s “The Glass Ceiling”) and Vincente Parra (from de la Iglesia’s “Cannibal Man”), and so with these two tried-and-true leads it is hard for this film to fail. While it is not as overtly frightening as the other two aforementioned films, “No One Heard the Scream” definitely has its moments. Sevilla plays a professional mistress who bids farewell to her older lover when she meets the handsome man next door (Parra); unfortunately for Sevilla, Parra has just murdered his wife. Read More »

Eloy de la Iglesia – El techo de cristal aka The Glass Ceiling (1971)

Marta spends a few days alone while her husband is on a business trip. But she starts to get scared when she hears some mysterious steps every night on the top floor. Her neighbor will try to convince her that it is her husband’s footsteps when he returns from work, but Marta does not believe it and begins to investigate. Read More »

Jaime de Armiñán – Mi querida señorita AKA My dearest senorita (1972)

Synopsis
Miss Adela Castro (José Luis López Vázquez in a superb performance),a mature lady from the provincial Spanish bourgeoisie, has spent her life in solitude, sewing, playing the piano, attending charity meetings at the local church and meditating on her forced spinsterhood. Her partially unacknowledged attraction to females, together with her lack of desire for her fiance drives Adela to her confessor and then to a doctor. The diagnosis is unambiguous: she is a man. Adela, now Juan, is then forced to confront both a prejudiced society and himself. Jaime Armiñán directed My Dearest Señorita in a context of profound social transition in Spain. Read More »