Steven Soderbergh

Steven Soderbergh – Kafka (1991)

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It seems the lives of writers are hot movie properties these days. First Barton Fink, then Naked Lunch, and now Kafka. Whoever could have imagined such a thing? After the meteoric commercial success of Soderbergh’s debut feature sex, lies, and videotape, the director chose for his second effort this hypothetical presentation of the life of Franz Kafka. The movie is not so much a biography but rather, a speculative depiction of Kafka’s daily circumstances. While not untrue to the specific facts of Kafka’s life, the movie focuses more on the environment of 1919 Prague that so influenced the author. In large part, the things at which the movie excels are precisely the things that also make Kafka’s work so enduringly vivid — the absurdity anchored by an exacting realism, the incomprehensibility coupled with utmost lucidity, the looming sense of paradox, futility, labyrinthine logic and impenetrable pressures. Read More »

Steven Soderbergh – And Everything Is Going Fine (2010)

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Soderbergh has brought us SPALDING GRAY’S FINAL MONOLOGUE with the film, “And Everything Is Going Fine”. He compiles what is essentially a final autobiographical testament of Gray’s life using rare footage of his TV interviews, recordings of his theatrical monologues, and even some footage taken personally by Gray with his family members. A simple mash-up of such footage gives Gray the oppourtunity to bring us one final monologue- from the grave- speaking about himself, just as he loved to do…for our pleasure, and his sanity!!! He truly was the best monologist, one-man-show and storyteller to ever grace the stage. Read More »

Steven Soderbergh – Schizopolis (1996)

Steven Soderbergh’s 1996 film is a free-form satire with a broad range of targets, chief among which is the form itself. Shot guerilla-style between The Underneath and Out of Sight, Schizopolis is an uninhibited, stream-of-consciousness window into Soderbergh (in goofy dual starring roles here) at play, with all commercial considerations stripped away. This is what it looks like when a gifted Hollywood filmmaker makes a student film. Read More »

Steven Soderbergh – The Limey (1999)

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Two icons of 60s cinema, Terence Stamp and Peter Fonda, go head-to-head in Steven Soderbergh’s stylish reworking of the lone avenger theme. Stamp plays Wilson, an ageing Cockney villain newly out of jail, who arrives in Los Angeles to ask some awkward questions. His beloved daughter, mistress of powerful rock promoter Terry Valentine (Fonda), has died in a car crash; but Wilson’s far from convinced it was an accident. With his gaunt, grim features and sparse white hair, Stamp’s a dead ringer for the angel of death. Or maybe, as Soderbergh hints with some intricate flashback and flash-forward cutting, the whole story is a dying man’s dream of vengeance. Echoes of Get Carter and Point Blank aren’t far to seek. Read More »

Steven Soderbergh – Fallen Angels: Professional Man aka Perfect Crimes: Professional Man (1995)

Johnny Lamb (Brendan Fraser) has two jobs: he’s an elevator operator by day and a hit man by night and he’s very good at both jobs. His Boss (Peter Coyote) sends him on a job that makes Lamb confront his conscience; maybe for the first time. The episode has gay relationship overtones seldom touched in hard-boiled novels nor found in film noir. Read More »

Robert Siodmak & Don Siegel & Steven Soderbergh – Stereoscopic Killers [Soderbergh Experimental Edit] (2016)

Steven Soderbergh mixes Siodmak’s 1946 and Siegel’s 1964 The Killers
with wide selection of musical numbers “when presented with the challenge of delivering
some audio/visual material for a series of events organized in LA ” Read More »

Steven Soderbergh – King of the Hill (1993)

Set in St. Louis during the Great Depression, King of the Hill follows the daily struggles of a resourceful and imaginative adolescent who, after his younger brother is sent to live with a relative and his tubercular mother to a sanitarium, must survive on his own in a run-down hotel during his salesman father’s long business trips. Read More »