The Female Gaze

Antonia Bird – Priest (1994)

Father Greg Pilkington (Linus Roache) is torn between his call as a conservative Catholic
priest and his secret life as a homosexual with a gay lover, frowned upon by the Church.
Upon hearing the confession of a young girl of her incestuous father, Greg enters an
intensely emotional spiritual struggle deciding between choosing morals over religion and one
life over another. Read More »

Julie Dash – Daughters of the Dust (1991)

Quote:
A film of spellbinding visual beauty and brilliant resonant performances, Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust has become a landmark of independent film. With great lyricism, Daughters tells the story of a large African-American family as they prepare to move North at the dawn of the 20th Century. Using this simple tale, the film brings to life the changing values, conflicts and struggles that confront every family as they leave their homeland for the promise of a new and better future. Read More »

Jane Campion – An Angel at My Table (1990)

Synopsis
Here is the story of a curly-haired little redhead who grew up to be one of New Zealand’s best authors, after enduring ordeals that would have put most people into a madhouse. The irony is that she was already in the madhouse, misdiagnosed as a schizophrenic, and subjected to more than 200 electroshock treatments even though there was nothing really wrong with her except for shyness and depression. Read More »

Kaz Cai & Wang Jing & Anocha Suwichakornpong – Breakfast Lunch Dinner (2010) (DVD)

Helmed by three female filmmakers from China, Thailand and Singapore respectively, the stories of these three films, Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, occurs at a specific mealtime.

In Breakfast, Mei travels by train from the north to visit her boyfriend who has settled down in the south. Breakfast explores the theme of finding one’s own bearings when in love.

Lunch starts off with two teenagers who skip school to have lunch and plans to watch a film. The two teenagers spend the afternoon talking about life and their dreams. Read More »

Stephanie Rothman – The Velvet Vampire (1971)

Quote:
“Velvet Vampire is a surreal artsy vampire movie from the hippie era ripe with seventies allusions to counter-culture ideology. Unfortunately this movie never quite lives up to its potential. What could have been a chilling in your face anti-establishment message about the hypocrisy of sanctified virtue and man’s desire to see his wife metamorphose into his own personal holy whore plays more like a timid low budget exploitation flick. Worse, it’s not aged well and may appear to contemporary eyes as more of a farce than the bizarre counterculture homily it is. But it’s still a fascinating movie to watch. Well worth renting if you can find a copy.” – Mise-en-scene Crypt Read More »

Callisto McNulty – Delphine et Carole, insoumuses (2019)

Delphine and Carole – Delphine Seyrig, the actress who starred in the films of Resnais and Buñuel, Duras and Akerman; and Carole Roussopoulos, the pioneering video-maker, who, after Jean-Luc Godard, was only the second person in France to use video as a film production tool. From the mid-1970s, in the turbulence of post’68 and the feminist movement, the two women embarked on a militant working partnership, making a series of videos devised as political interventions to champion the struggle of women, whether actresses, prostitutes or workers.
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Kathleen Collins – Losing Ground (1982)

Synopsis
A comedy-drama about a Black American female philosophy professor and her insensitive, philandering, and flamboyant artist husband who are having a marital crisis. When the wife goes off on an almost unbelievable journey to find “ecstasy”, her husband is forced to see her in a different light. Read More »