Tunisia

Mehdi Barsaoui – Bik Eneich: Un fils AKA A Son (2019)

Tunisia, summer 2011. The holiday to Southern country ends in disaster for Fares, Meriem and their 10-year old son Aziz when he is accidentally shot in an ambush. His injury will change their lives as Aziz needs a liver transplant, which leads to the discovery of a long-buried secret. Will Aziz and their relationship survive? Read More »

Férid Boughedir – Caméra d’Afrique AKA Twenty Years of African Cinema (1983)

Quote:
After several decades of colonial cinema using Africa as an exotic setting – often denying humanity and dignity to its people – and 70 years after the invention of the cinema, freshly independent Africans take hold at long last of that movie-camera which had been forbidden to them for so long. Despite a total lack of means and infrastructures, and filming against all odds, using by chance any African or foreign support, they try to show African reality in its variegated forms, as it is seen at last through African eyes. Using large extracts from the main films, interventions of filmakers, and rare vintage footage CAMERA D’AFRIQUE recalls the early 20 years of those new “author films”, created in Sub-Saharan Africa, which bear witness to an amazing thirst for showing and expressing themselves, never extinguished to this day. Read More »

Hinde Boujemaa – Noura Rêve AKA Noura dreams (2019)

Quote:
With her abusive husband in jail and a coveted divorce pending, hardworking Noura can almost grasp a happy, new life with lover Lassaad – but when the best-laid plans are upended, Noura must tap her unshakable will to fulfill her dream. Read More »

Nacer Khemir – Looking for Muhyiddin (2014)

A man (played by the filmmaker Nacer Khemir) returns home to Tunisia to bury his mother. After the burial, his father gives him an “amana” to be handed to a certain Sheikh named Muhyiddin. Taken by his father’s request, the man immediately sets out on an epic journey to find the long lost Sheikh and deliver the “amana.” Throughout the trip, he is guided by a mysterious spiritual master and the many friends of the Sheikh he encounters along the way. As the adventure unfolds, we discover the rich life of this Sheikh and his uncompromising love for humanity. For under his teachings, different beliefs, faiths, and ways of life can only converge and become one. Read More »

Ala Eddine Slim – Akher Wahed Fina AKA The Last of Us (2016)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

With no dialogue, The Last of Us tracks a Sub-Saharan man through the desert to North Africa where he steals a boat. When it breaks down in the middle of the sea, he begins an imaginary surrealistic odyssey where he meets an older man, who might be an altered version of himself, and, in a wild landscape, rediscovers his relationship with primary nature. “A philosophical fable on being lost” (Giona Nazzaro).

Awarded with the Lion Of the Future in the 73rd Venice Film Festival (2016) Read More »

Leyla Bouzid – À peine j’ouvre les yeux AKA As I Open My Eyes (2015)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Tunis, summer 2010, a few months before the Revolution: Farah, 18 years-old, has just graduated and her family already sees her as a future doctor. But she doesn’t think the same way. She sings in a political rock band. She has a passion for life, gets drunk, discovers love and her city by night against the will of her mother Hayet, who knows Tunisia and its dangers too well. Read More »

Néjib Belkadhi – VHS – Kahloucha (2006)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Moncef Kahloucha is a fan of ’70s genre movies, especially those with Bruce Lee, Jim Kelly and Clint Eastwood. Apart from working as a house painter in Kazmet, a poor Tunician locality, Kahloucha is a tenacious director, actor, screenwriter and prop master in his own zero-budget productions. At the limits of communal, visceral cinema captured on a VHS camera, it literally costs Kahloucha blood, sweat and tears to shoot his next film: Tarzan of the Arabs, opening at a bar TV set. With an amplified eye, Néjib Belkhadi not only records a ferocious making-of, but also manages to come out with a crystal-clear map of Kazmet’s social ills, including the Arabs who must survive in their Italian exile to the tune of the anthological “Tunisino” by Neshez. The savage primitiveness of the shooting, the struggle for a place in the ads of the neighbors-actors and Kahloucha’s displays of tinsel used in previous films are some gripping, all but likely moments of an incendiary passion for cinema.
Read More »