Western

Leslie Fenton – Streets of Laredo (1949)

Quote:
Streets of Laredo is a streamlined and Technicolorful remake of Paramount’s 1936 box-office champ The Texas Rangers. William Holden, William Bendix and MacDonald Carey star as roguish outlaws Jim Dawkins, Wahoo Jones and Lorn Remming. After rescuing a little girl named Rannie Carter from a wicked tax collector, Dawkins and Jones decide to switch to the right side of the law; Remming, however, has other ideas. Years later, Rennie has grown up quite prettily into Mona Freeman, while Jim and Wahoo have become scrupulous members of the newly-formed Texas Rangers. Jim is in love with Rennie, but she has eyes for the still-crooked Lorn — at least until Lorn proves to be the louse that the audience knew he was from the first reel. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – The Massacre (1912)

As the woman he loved lay dying, the former suitor swore to protect the child of the other man, just killed in battle. The baby grown to womanhood, the man’s love for the mother was felt again, but a stranger claimed the girl’s love. So the man with his trust left for the far Northwestern country and joined in the government wars against the Indians. There again he met the life which he had sworn to protect. How well he succeeded, the returning young husband could most appreciate, after one of the most deadly massacres and Indian battles of the period. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – Friends (1912)

At the mining-camp of Golden Creek, the little orphan girl of the late proprietor of Golden Creek Inn is the pet of all the miners. Her father had long been their great friend and adviser, and hence his little daughter always commanded their greatest respect. She becomes greatly infatuated with Dandy Jack, who is considered by all as her sweetheart. Jack decides to leave the camp for other diggings, and the little one is almost heartbroken. As he is leaving, he meets Bob, his old chum, who has just arrived at the camp. Their greeting shows clearly the value of that little word “friends.” Later on, Bob comes to the Inn and falls deeply in love with the little orphan, who has realized by this time that her feeling for Jack was infatuation rather than love. Hence she and Bob are engaged to be married. Shortly before the day set for the wedding, Jack returns and is twitted by the boys about the apparently fickle girl, whereupon he wagers that he can win her back, not knowing, of course, who the successful suitor is. The outcome is a revelation to all. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – The Last Drop of Water (1911)

A wagon train heading west across the great desert runs out of water, and is attacked by Indians. One man — their last hope — is sent out to find water. Read More »

Roy Ward Baker – The Singer Not the Song (1961)

Summary:
During the 1950s, in a small isolated Mexican village, the local Roman Catholic priest, Father Gomez (Leslie French), is an older man with a broken spirit. During his tenure in the village of Quantano, he fought hard to keep his flock of parishioners, in spite of threats and intimidation from the part of local bandit Anacleto Comachi (Sir Dirk Bogarde) and his men. The atheistic bandit has imposed his tyrannical rule over the region for many years. The local Police cannot find any witnesses to come forward and testify to any wrongdoing from the part of Anacleto. Therefore, they cannot charge him or arrest him. The Catholic Church replaces Father Gomez with a younger, more energetic priest, Father Keogh (Sir John Mills) from Ireland. Before departing the village, Father Gomez warns Father Keogh of the dangers of defying Anacleto Comachi’s authority. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – The Battle of Elderbush Gulch (1913)

On the day of the dog feast at the Indian encampment, the waifs arrived at Elderbush Gulch. Their pet pups came with them. ‘”Now we eat,” said the chief’s son, when he saw the pup’s fat little hides, but he met his death instead. “The blood of the whites,” cried the red men, and all on account of two small dogs, the settlement at Elderbush Gulch was wiped from the map. Yet many strong hearts lived to tell the tale, along with the dogs, the waifs and the baby. Read More »

George Pal – 7 Faces of Dr. Lao (1964)

The movie is based on a novel called The Circus of Dr. Lao by Charles G. Finney about a mysterious, elderly Chinese gentleman who brings a rather unusual circus to a small Western town at the turn of the 20th century. The film opens as Dr. Lao (Tony Randall) rides into the town of Abalone on a donkey, pausing just long enough to light his pipe with a flame that sprouts from his thumb. He ignores the initial mockery of the locals and visits the newspaper office to place an advertisement about his circus coming to town. While there he overhears a conversation between the profiteering town bully, Clint Stark (Arthur O’Connell), and the plucky newspaper editor Edward Cunningham (John Ericson). Stark plans to buy out everyone in town for sinister (and capitalistic) purposes, and Ed is determined to prevent just that from happening. While the power struggle is established over the next 30 minutes, we are introduced to the rest of the cast including the widowed librarian, Angela Benedict (Barbara Eden), and a bevy of colorful town characters. Meanwhile, Dr. Lao has set up his circus just outside of town, where he will change the lives of the townsfolk forever. Read More »