Wim Wenders

Wim Wenders – Hammett (1982)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

The plot
Based in part on detective-fiction writer Dashiell Hammett’s early experiences as a Pinkerton detective, this moderately-noir film has Hammett (using his little-known first name, Sam) involved in an elaborate extortion plot by his former detective agency mentor, Jimmy Ryan. Ryan shows up at Hammett’s San Francisco digs searching for a mysterious Chinese girl, Crystal Ling. He calls in a marker from Hammett’s days at the detective agency to get his help in finding the girl, who turns out to be a very sexy and shrewd former prostitute and porn star. She has photographs of San Francisco’s most influential citizens engaged in sexual fantasy with her and she means to turn them into a million-dollar payday. The tubercular Hammett must cope with an unfriendly police force, a mysterious gunsel intent on inflicting serious harm, and betrayal by supposed friends; to save the reputations of the powerful while tweaking their collective noses
Written by Joe Jurca, imdb.com Read More »

Wim Wenders – Im Lauf der Zeit aka Kings of the Road (1976)

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B000A0JTA2.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Dave Kehr of the Chicago Reader wrote:

The first masterpiece of the New German Cinema. Wim Wenders’s existentialized road movie follows two drifters–an itinerant movie-projector repairman and a child psychologist who has followed his patients by dropping out–in a three-hour ramble through a deflated Germany, touching on their private pasts and their hopes for the future. It’s full of references to Hawks, Ford, and Lang, and one scene has been lovingly lifted in its entirety from Nicholas Ray’s The Lusty Men. As the hommages indicate, one of the subjects is the death of cinema, but this isn’t an insider’s movie. Wenders examines a played-out culture looking for one last move. An engrossing, enveloping film, made with great craft and photographed in highly textured black-and-white by Robby Muller (1976). Read More »

Wim Wenders – In weiter Ferne, so nah! AKA Faraway, So Close! (1993)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
In Faraway, So Close! angels watch over the people of Berlin. The world weighs heavily upon these men and women. Their attachment to things diminishes their desire for the invisible. As one angel laments, “It’s so exhausting to love people who run away from us.”

Despite the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War, the people of Eastern Europe are anxious about the future. The angel Cassiel, played by Otto Sand, feels great compassion for them. When a young girl falls from the balcony of her high-rise building, his urge to do good is so strong that he crosses over into humanness and catches the girl in his arms on the street. All he loses in this change of existence are his wings and ponytail. Read More »

Wim Wenders – Die Gebrüder Skladanowsky AKA A Trick of the Light (1995)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
“A Trick of Light” is a silly yet sporadically entertaining pseudo-documentary in which filmmaker Wim Wenders, along with the help of several film school students, tells the story of the Skladanowsky brothers – Max, Eugen, and Emil. In the late 1800s, the trio invented a method for projecting moving images which they called a Bioscope; unfortunately for the siblings, Auguste and Louis Lumière also emerged at around the same time with a similar – yet vastly superior – device called the Cinematographe. Wenders alternates between re-enacted footage of the brothers’ misadventures and an interview with Max’s 91-year-old daughter, with the former shot entirely on a vintage, hand-cranked camera (lending such sequences the feel of an authentic silent movie). It’s all very cute and watchable, though one can’t help but lament Wenders’ ill-advised decision to weave fictional elements into the interview footage (ie Max’s elderly daughter is interesting enough to ensure that such shenanigans ultimately come off as distracting and superfluous). Add to that the utterly interminable end credits (which go on for 20 minutes!), and you’ve got a film that’s admittedly not as bad as some of Wenders other efforts but disappointing nevertheless. Read More »

Wim Wenders – Chambre 666 AKA Room 666 (1982)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis:
During the 1982 Cannes Film Festival, Wenders asks a number of film directors from around the world to get, each one at a time, into a hotel room, turn on the camera and sound recorder, and, in solitude, answer a simple question: “What is the future of cinema?”. Read More »

Wim Wenders – Every Thing Will Be Fine (2015) (HD)

 photo HzsJg74.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis by Jack Rodgers
A car accident brings together a writer, his girlfriend, a publisher’s assistant, and a mother in mourning. James Franco, Rachel McAdams, Charlotte Gainsbourg, and Marie-Josée Croze co-star. Directed by Wim Wenders. Read More »

Wim Wenders – Der Himmel uber Berlin aka Wings of Desire (1987)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Outline :

Quote:
This Wim Wenders film centers around the story of two angels wandering in a mixture of post-war and modern Berlin. Invisible to humans, they nevertheless give their help and comfort to all the lonely and depressed souls they meet. Finally, after many centuries, one of the angels becomes unhappy with his immortal state and wishes to become human in order to experience the joys of everyday life. He meets a circus acrobat and finds in her the fufillment of all his mortal desires. He also discovers that he is not alone in making this cross over, and that a purely spiritual experience is not enough to satisfy anyone. Read More »