World War One

David Lean – Ryan’s Daughter [Roadshow version] (1970)

Quote:
Set in the wake of the 1916 Easter Rising, a married woman in a small Irish village has an affair with a troubled British officer. Read More »

Rex Ingram – The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921)

Plot Summary:
Madariaga is an Argentinian cattle baron with two daughters: one married a Frenchman, the other a German. Madariaga favors his French grandson, Julio, as his heir, but Julio is a wastrel and rake whose greatest achivement is tangoing well. When Madariaga dies, his fortune is split between his daughters. The German side of the family goes back to Berlin, while the French half moves to Paris, where Julio becomes a painter and falls in love with Marguerite, a married woman. When WWI explodes (and is described by the mystic Tchernoff as the coming Apocalypse), and Marguerite’s husband is blinded, Julio decides he must join the army, and becomes a reformed character. But Death hasn’t finished gathering his harvest yet and Julio must face his own cousin on the battlefield. Read More »

Luigi Comencini – Mio Dio, come sono caduta in basso! AKA My God, how low I’ve fallen! AKA Till Marriage Do Us Part (1974)

At the beginning of the twentieth century the noble and chaste Eugenia (L. Antonelli) and the enriched plebeian Raimondo (O. Lionello), Sicilians, come to learn by telegram on their wedding night to have the same father, but for social propriety, and economic reasons, they decide to play the comedy in front of the world by living in chaste marriage. According to the current morality, he can afford some escapade but the virginal wife, while eager to penetrate the mysteries of the flesh, must restrain herself. It will be the readings of D’Annunzio to dismantle her resistance. Read More »

Abel Gance – J’accuse! (1919)

The Movie
J’Accuse is a story set against the backdrop of World War I that is considered one of the most technically advanced films of the era and the first major pacifist film. Gance, who had served briefly in the military during World War I, decided to return to active service in 1919 in order to film real battle scenes to include in the project. The film was reedited and shortened for peacetime reissue in 1922, and has not been available since in its original form.
Lobster Films Studios, Paris, working in collaboration with Netherlands Filmmuseum have culled materials from the Lobster Collection, the Czech archive in Prague, the Cinematheque Francaise, and the Netherlands Filmmuseum to make the best possible and most complete edition of the original 1919 edit of the film. Read More »

Roger Corman – Von Richthofen and Brown AKA The Red Baron (1971)

Synopsis:
World War I: an allied squadron and a German squadron face off daily in the skies. Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, leads one, and, although one of his decisions cost the life of his predecessor, he expects his men to honor codes of conduct. The allied squad has similar class divisions: its colonel, an aristocrat, laments that men he considers peasants are now fliers, including a cynical and ruthless Canadian, Roy Brown, the squad’s ace. As the tactics of both sides break more rules and become more destructive, the Baron must decide if he is a soldier first or part of the ruling class. He and Brown have two aerial battles, trivial in the larger scheme yet tragic. Read More »

King Vidor & George W. Hill – The Big Parade [+Extras] (1925)

Quote:
A Superlative War Picture.
An eloquent pictorial epic of the World War was presented last night at the Astor Theatre before a sophisticated gathering that was intermittently stirred to laughter and tears. This powerful photodrama is entitled “The Big Parade,” having been converted to the screen from a story by Laurence Stallings, co-author of “What Price Glory,” and directed by King Vidor. It is a subject so compelling and realistic that one feels impelled to approach a review of it with all the respect it deserves, for as a motion picture it is something beyond the fondest dreams of most people. Read More »

Georg Jacoby – Der feldgraue Groschen AKA A Coin the Colour of Battle Field Grey (1917)

Promotional film for war loans and bonds. Mother Froehlich sells her clock and sends the money to her son fighting in war. Then they get attacked and someone else finds the lucky coin… (themoviedb.org) Read More »