Alfred Hitchcock – Juno and the Paycock (1930)

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From Channel 4 Film:

Early British Hitchcock which has the future master of suspense trying to make a living with this faithful adaptation of O’Casey’s classic play, chronicling the ups and downs of an Irish family in the Dublin of the 1920s. Most of it is a straight filming of the play – and was acknowledged as such by Hitchcock – even though handsomely photographed and acted. When the action opens up towards the end, Hitch gets a chance to flex his cinematic muscle with a predictably dramatic ending.

Chris Hughes says this:

By 1929 Alfred Hitchcock had established himself as a significant rising star in British cinema. Hitchcock was in the formative stage of his career and though he was gaining new respect with every project, he didn’t yet wield the clout necessary to choose his own scripts, actors and crew. Still, the ‘Hitchcock touch’ was apparent in many of his early films and they bear viewing today as important milestones in a soon to be legendary career. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – Notorious [+Extras] (1946)

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One of Hitchcock’s finest films of the ’40s, using its espionage plot about Nazis hiding out in South America as a mere MacGuffin, in order to focus on a perverse, cruel love affair between US agent Grant and alcoholic Bergman, whom he blackmails into providing sexual favours for the German Rains as a means of getting information. Suspense there is, but what really distinguishes the film is the way its smooth, polished surface illuminates a sickening tangle of self-sacrifice, exploitation, suspicion, and emotional dependence. Grant, in fact, is the least sympathetic character in the dark, ever-shifting relationships on view, while Rains, oppressed by a cigar-chewing, possessive mother and deceived by all around him, is treated with great generosity. Less war thriller than black romance, it in fact looks forward to the misanthropic portrait of manipulation in Vertigo. — GA, Time Out Film Guide 13 Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – Psycho (1960)

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from AllMovie
In 1960, Alfred Hitchcock was already famous as the screen’s master of suspense (and perhaps the best-known film director in the world) when he released Psycho and forever changed the shape and tone of the screen thriller. From its first scene, in which an unmarried couple balances pleasure and guilt in a lunchtime liaison in a cheap hotel (hardly a common moment in a major studio film in 1960), Psycho announced that it was taking the audience to places it had never been before, and on that score what followed would hardly disappoint. Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) is unhappy in her job at a Phoenix, Arizona real estate office and frustrated in her romance with hardware store manager Sam Loomis (John Gavin). One afternoon, Marion is given $40,000 in cash to be deposited in the bank. Minutes later, impulse has taken over and Marion takes off with the cash, hoping to leave Phoenix for good and start a new life with her purloined nest egg. 36 hours later, paranoia and exhaustion have started to set in, and Marion decides to stop for the night at the Bates Motel, where nervous but personable innkeeper Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) cheerfully mentions that she’s the first guest in weeks, before he regales her with curious stories about his mother. There’s hardly a film fan alive who doesn’t know what happens next, but while the shower scene is justifiably the film’s most famous sequence, there are dozens of memorable bits throughout this film. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – Strangers on a Train (1951)

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‘Strangers on a Train,’ Another Hitchcock Venture, Arrives at the Warner Theatre
It appears that Alfred Hitchcock is fascinated with the Svengali theme, as well as with his own dexterity in performing macabre tricks. His last picture, “Rope,” will be remembered as a stunt (which didn’t succeed) involving a psychopathic murderer who induced another young man to kill for thrills. Now, in his latest effort, called “Strangers on a Train,” which served to reopen the Strand Theatre last night under its new name, the Warner, Mr. Hitchcock again is tossing a crazy murder story in the air and trying to con us into thinking that it will stand up without support. Read More »

Nikola Tanhofer – H-8 (1958)

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Quote:
A bus and a truck are moving towards each other along a two-way traffic highway on a rainy day. At the very beginning we learn that a reckless driver of another car will cause them to collide while trying to pass the bus; we even learn what seats will spell doom for their occupants. The rest of the movie follows two streams of events on the bus and on the truck, getting us to know and like a wide variety of characters, wondering which ones will end up being casualties and holding breath for our favourites. The epilogue brings some more surprises… Read More »

Georg Tressler – Sukkubus – den Teufel im Leib (1989)

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STORY:

A Swiss legend tells of three shepherds and their privations, “weiberlosen” time in the mountains. And as her wicked doings will be severely punished – by a bare Wurzelhexe …
REVIEW:

A former classmate, let’s call him Fred, looks at the happy Sepp Forcher – with sound turned off. Namely Fred loves the beauty of the local mountains. But not the accompanying volksdümmliche Gedudel.

Succubus – the devil in him would also be a film for Fred. For the beauty of the Alpine mountains is captured very atmospheric. And instead of folk music here sounds very consistent, Spaghetti Western-inspired score.

Succubus – THE DEVIL IN THE BODY is also a film for fans of the lower instincts. Von wegen “on pastures, there’s no sin”: One of our Senner is a nasty Saubartl who had pushed for dinner hand in his pants and lunged after the crisp boys in bed next to him.

Just a boy has no interest in the said strong men gripping hands, but he longs for the warm, wet tongue, his favorite. Which he then “herumkriegt. How he hires, the It beggars … Read More »

Gary Tarn – Black Sun (2005)

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Brief synopsis :
(www.britfilms.com)

Tragically blinded in a random street mugging, Hugues de Montalembert defied expectation and continued to travel the world, alone. In Black Sun film-maker and composer Gary Tarn constructs a poetic meditation on an extraordinary life without vision.

Description
(by kamera.co.uk)

Black Sun documents the artist’s will to live a full life, free of fear and impediment. Opening with aerial shots of New York, Montalembert describes the violent events that left him sightless. As he does, identifiable images meld together into a palette of colours, finally becoming little more than a spectrum of lights, slowly dimming, until we are left with the ‘dark honey’ glow that Montalembart tells us he has lived with for the last twenty-eight years. He candidly describes his refusal to go through the motions that doctors told him were the steps to his recovery – nervous breakdown, acceptance of disability, rehabilitation and adapting to a new life full of restrictions – instead setting out his own plan, which would see him travel alone to Indonesia within 18 months of the attack. From there he journeyed to Bali, where he began to write down his experiences. The resulting book became an international bestseller. Since then, Montalembert has continued to travel and write.
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