Tag Archives: 1910s

Mauritz Stiller – Balettprimadonnan AKA Anjala the Dancer (1916)

The musician Wolo is in love with the beautiful peasant girl Anjuta. She is forced, by her stepmother who runs a speakeasy, to dance for the drunken guests of the tavern. Restored by The Swedish Film Institute in 2016.

Quote:
A first preservation of Mauritz Stiller’s Balettprimadonnan was carried out in 1994, from a fragment of a tinted and toned nitrate print with Spanish intertitles found in Zaragoza, Spain. In 2015, the Filmoteca Espanola in Madrid identified a second fragment with Spanish intertitles of the film in its collections, originating from the same nitrate print, meaning that approximately half of the film has survived. Read More »

Kiyoshi Kurosawa – Katte ni shiyagare!! Dasshutsu keikaku AKA Suit Yourself or Shoot Yourself!! 2 – The Escape (1995)

Quote:
Nestled in the mid 90’s when Kurosawa was heavily involved in creating diptych crime stories such as “The Serpent’s Path” and “Eyes of the Spider” and especially his “Revenge” double feature, “Suit Yourself or Shoot Yourself” was filmed and released for the home video market in Japan. The idea, six variations of life surrounding two low level yakuza gophers, expound on Kurosawa’s fascination with subverting the same idea and story in a wildly divergent manner. Read More »

Oscar Apfel & Cecil B. DeMille – The Squaw Man (1914)

A chivalrous British officer takes the blame for his cousin’s embezzlement and journeys to the American West to start a new life on a cattle ranch. Read More »

August Blom – Ekspeditricen AKA In the Prime of Life (1911)

Yay! Another Danish silent melodrama. Actually, this is a particularly superior example. The Danish Film Institute’s website, from which this copy comes, descrbes it thusly:

Quote:
A wealthy young man, Edgar, sees a shopgirl, Ellen, and is immediately attracted to her. He buys her flowers. They meet next Sunday and, presumably, often thereafter. Three months later Ellen is pregnant. The couple decide to marry, and Edgar tells his mother. His father convinces him not to marry Ellen and sends him away to visit friends in the country. The daughter of the family he visits, Lily, gets him to write to Ellen when she finds out about her. Edgar’s fahter, however, has convinced Ellen’s former employer, to whom the letters have been sent, to turn them over to him. When Edgar gets no reply from Ellen, he secretly returns to the city. Read More »

Abel Gance – Les gaz mortels (1916)

Synopsis:
Hopson, a prestigious scientist, studies the effect of snake venom to cure many diseases of mankind. His son enlists in the army when the Great War breaks out. A series of circumstances will lead the scientist to change his way of thinking about values ​​and principles that until then he had as immovable. Read More »

Charles Taze Russell – Photo-Drama of Creation (1914)

The Photo-Drama of Creation, or Creation-Drama, was a four-part Christian film (eight hours in total) produced by the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania under the direction of Charles Taze Russell, the founder of the Bible Student movement. The film presented Russell’s beliefs about God’s plan from the creation of the earth through to the end of the 1,000 year reign of Christ.

Production began in 1912, and the presentation was introduced to audiences in 1914. It was the first major screenplay to incorporate synchronized sound, moving film, and color slides. Russell also published an accompanying book, Scenario of the Photo-Drama of Creation, in various languages. Read More »

Alberto Capozzi & Gero Zambuto – Il fiacre n. 13 (1917)

EP.1 – IL DELITTO AL PONTE DE NEULLY
EP.2 – GIAN GIOVEDÌ’
EP.3 – LA FIGLIA DEL GHIGLIOTTINATO
EP.4 – GIUSTIZIA!
“Not many Italian silent films structured in episodes have survived, though a good many were made (see Monica Dall’Asta, “La diffusione dei film a episodi in Europa”, in Storia del cinema mondiale. Vol. 1: L’Europa. I. Miti, luoghi divi, Einaudi, 1999, p.309). Most of them were based on foreign models, particularly French, and some were direct reworkings. One such case is Il Fiacre n. 13, from the novel of the same title by Xavier Henri Aymon Perrin, Count of Montépin, a highly prolific and much-loved author whose books were vehicles for the depiction of social inequality, narrating stories of love, death, betrayal, blackmail, and redemption. Read More »