Tag Archives: 1920s

Vladimir Barsky – Bela (1927)

Quote:
A drama based on a chapter of Lermontov’s novel “A Hero of Our Time”.

Pechorin serves in a remote fortress. One day in a neighbouring village he meets Bela, the daughter of a local prince, at a wedding. With the help of her brother Azamat, Pechorin takes the girl to the fortress. In return he gives Azamat a horse, which he steals from the highwayman Kazbich. Pechorin’s infatuation soon subsides, and he now spends more and more time hunting. Read More »

Roy Del Ruth – The Desert Song (1929)

Review Summary
After literally inventing the movie musical with The Jazz Singer, Warner Bros. purchased the motion picture rights to the evergreen Sigmund Romberg/Oscar Hammerstein II 2nd operetta The Desert Song. Although the results looked like a photographed stage play (a common failing of early-talkie songfests), the unforgettable Romberg-Hammerstein tunes ({&The Riff Song}, {&One Alone}, the title number) more than carried the day. John Boles stars as The Red Shadow, the Robin Hood-like leader of the Riffs and the bane of the existence of General Bierbieu (Edward Martindel). The good General has another cross to bear in the form of his nerdish, lily-livered son Pierre, who is likewise despised by heroine Margot (Carlotta King). Read More »

James Parrott – The Hoose-Gow (1929)

Stanley and Oliver protest that they were only bystanders to the raid, but are hauled off to a prison labor camp anyway. They procede with their usual mayhem, Stanley getting his pick stuck in Oliver’s coat, Oliver chopping down a tree which just happens to contain the guard lookout post. When the Governor’s party happens by, Oliver accidentally pokes a hole in his car’s radiator, then attempts to stop the leak by filling the radiator with rice. The result is melee with all involved throwing clumps of soggy rice at each other. Read More »

James Parrott – Perfect Day (1929)

Plans for a nice Sunday picnic seemed doomed even before Stanley and Oliver and their families get into the car. First the boys get into a fight and destroy all the sandwiches. Then the car itself keeps acting up, requiring repeated exits and reboardings by the boys, their wives and grouchy, gout-ridden Uncle Edgar. A brick-throwing tiff with a neighbor threatens to escalate into general mayhem until the local parson strolls by. They finally manage to get underway, steering toward an innocent-looking mud puddle in the street. Read More »

James Parrott – They Go Boom! (1929)

Synopsis
Stanley’s attempts to treat Oliver’s cold include dropping a swab down his friend’s throat, applying a mustard plaster to his rump, and inflating the air mattress from the gas jet until it has Oliver pressed against the ceiling. Read More »

Marcel Carné & Michel Sanvoisin – Nogent, Eldorado du dimanche (1929)

IMDB Review wrote:
Seven years before his first feature-length film “Jenny” ,Carné already displayed the populisme,the command of the picture and the brilliance which would mark his golden era (1936-1946) .With hindsight,it is pity that ,for lack of money,he could not make his final film ,”Mouche” from Guy de Maupassant , which would have taken place down by the Marne ,and which might perhaps have returned him to former glories. Read More »

Charles Reisner – The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929)

Plot: MGM’s big showcase of musical talent is the main appeal of this film. It’s clunky, but it was filmed literally at the dawn of the sound age. So where else could you see Joan Crawford, Marion Davies, Marie Dressler, Laurel, & Hardy, Buster Keaton, John Gilbert, Norma Shearer, Cliff Edwards, Rose Tyler, Conrad Nagel, Charles King, Polly Moran, Bessie Love, William Haines, Anita Page, Gus Edwards and your master of ceremonies, Jack Benny. Read More »