Tag Archives: 1970s

Kazuhiko Yamaguchi – Zubekô banchô: Tôkyô nagaremono AKA Delinquent Girl Boss 2 – Tokyo Drifters (1970)

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The second part in the series feels a bit like a quick cash in on the success of the original… although that’s not to say it’s a bad movie. It’s quite an enjoyable film actually, if you’re a genre fan that is. The main problem is that it’s missing a proper storyline. Between the awesome reform school opening and stylish action finale there isn’t a whole lot happening. Director Yamaguchi relies a bit too much on humour and general ’hanging out with the characters’. Almost all darker content has been dropped from the film, and the exploitation elements, that were already brief in the previous film, have been further toned down; the violence is mostly bloodless, and there is only brief nudity, always in comical context. Read More »

Adoor Gopalakrishnan – Kodiyettam (1977)

Adoor’s second feature film made five years after Swayamvaram achieved commercial success in Kerala, while reaching an artistic height.

Its structure is that of a festival in a village temple. I wanted to create an intimate experience of everyday rural life. It is structured in such a way as to look natural, as if there are no outside interventions. During the course of the film, the festival comes full circle, parallel to it is the inner development of the character as well. Read More »

Anthony Page – I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1977)

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Based very loosely on the intricate novel by Joanne Greenberg. A young woman’s devotion to a childhood fantasy kingdom has taken over her entire life and causes her endless pain and degradation. Placed in a mental hospital, she has the great good fortune to have a truly caring therapist who tries to help her accept reality, even though reality isn’t so great either. Read More »

Blake Edwards – Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978)

Fifth of the Pink Panther series and the last to star Peter Sellers before his untimely death. French mobster, Phillip Douvier has got a problem – hardly none of the other crime families give his family any respect. To try and fix this problem, he gives orders to murder Chief Inspector Clouseau who everybody think is a genius and only a few like Chief Inspector Dreyfus know of his true stupidity. Thanks due to a mixup an escaping criminal dies in Clouseau’s car, and it crashes and explodes. Chief Inspector Dreyfus is delighted (so much so that when at the memorial service he tries very hard not to laugh out in delight and everybody thinks he’s crying), but Clouseau, wondering who’s out to kill him gets the help of his oriental servant Cato and Douvier’s secretary and ex-lover Simone Legree to help solve the mystery… Read More »

Blake Edwards – The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Synopsis:
Charles Dreyfus (Herbert Lom), the Chief Inspector of the Surete and superior of Inspector Clouseau was last seen in The Return of the Pink Panther (1975) suffering a breakdown cause of Clouseau’s torment. He decides to try and kill him, but fails and was last seen confined to a mental asylum. This movie begins three years later, Dreyfus’ doctors think is well enough to be released, but before he is, Clouseau visits him and agitates him into killing him, so he’s not released. But he escapes and tries to kill Clouseau, but fails. He then decides to recruit some of the best criminals in the world, and then kidnaps a noted English scientist and creates a device that can destroy the world. After using it, his only demand is Clouseau. So every country in the world sends their best assassin to kill him but fail. And Clouseau tries to find Dreyfus before he does any more damage. Read More »

Blake Edwards – The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)

Synopsis:
Third in the Pink Panther film franchise. The “Pink Panther” Diamond is stolen once again from Lugash and a white glove is left making everybody think that the famous jewel thief “The Phantom” has stolen it. This surprises everybody as it was thought that The Phantom was retired. It also surprises The Phantom (a.k.a. Sir Charles Litton (Christopher Plummer)) himself as he didn’t do it. He sets out from the south of France to Lugash find the diamond and to clear his name as pressure comes from the Lugash authorities to give back the diamond. Meanwhile, infamous French Detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau (Peter Sellers) is called in to find the diamond and he immediately goes to the south of France to check up on Sir Charles. Lady Claudine Litton, Charles’ wife (Catherine Schell), discovers this and leads Clouseau on a false trail and, as normal, Clouseau, with his clueless methods, and Cato Fong (Burt Kwouk), his oriental manservant, cause mayhem as they try to find the diamond. Meanwhile, Clouseau pushes his boss, Chief Inspector Charles Dreyfus (Herbert Lom) too far and as the story proceeds, Dreyfus makes attempts to murder Clouseau and get him out of his life forever. Read More »

Agnès Varda – Daguerréotypes [+Extras] (1976)

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Originally shot in the mid-’70s, Agnès Varda’s vérité documentary Daguerréotypes has aged splendidly, acquiring flavors that would’ve been inconceivable at the time it was made. Back then, Varda hauled her camera around her Paris neighborhood on the Rue Daguerre, intending to capture what went on in the little shops in what was at the time one of the city’s most bustling commercial districts. As Varda explains early on in her voiceover narration, she wasn’t looking for esoterica. She filmed butchers, bakers, tailors, grocers, hairstylists, driving-school instructors… people she saw every day. And her vignettes are short: just a transaction or two, cut together with interviews about the merchants’ pasts, and portrait-style shots of them puttering about their businesses. Read More »