Tag Archives: 1970s

Pierre Zucca – Vincent mit l’âne dans un pré (et s’en vint dans l’autre) (1975)

Synopsis(from All Movie Guide):
Living a dismal life taking care of his uncommunicative and nearly blind father, Vincent (Fabrice Luchini), a sculptor, tries to make life better for himself but fails for a variety of reasons. Read More »

Jacques Doillon – La femme qui pleure AKA The Crying Woman (1979)

SYNOPSIS:
Though he has been having affairs for years, one day when Jacques comes home from being with his mistress, his wife Dominique greets him with tears and demands for affection. After having accepted the situation for so long, it is puzzling to him that she has suddenly grown so demanding. He is not about to leave either woman. Dominique attempts to cope when he brings his mistress home with him, but her inner state is one of increasing hysteria, and tragedy is never very far away. Read More »

Martial Raysse – Le Grand Depart (1971)

Quote:
Not a good movie, though a prime example of audacious, rule-breaking cinema. It’s an early seventies French film shown almost entirely in negative exposure, which in itself makes it worth a watch.

The Package
LE GRAND DEPART (THE GRAND DEPARTURE; 1972) was the only feature directed by the famed French painter and sculptor Martial Raysse. In keeping with the revolutionary spirit of the time, LE GRAND DEPART has no plot to speak of and appears to have been largely made up on the spot. It shares a kinship with such films as BEGOTTEN (1990) and the X-rated short THE OPERATION (1995), both of which experimented with negative exposure (and far more effectively).
For decades LE GRAND DEPART was thought a “lost” film, but in late 2008 it made its DVD debut (in France), to alternately enchant and disappoint viewers anew. Read More »

Jacques Demy – L’Événement le plus important depuis que l’homme a marché sur la lune AKA A Slightly Pregnant Man (1973)

Synopsis:
A male Parisian driving school owner who goes to see his doctor and complains of feeling run down is pronounced four months pregnant. When the diagnosis is confirmed by a specialist, the result is an international media frenzy. Read More »

Hrishikesh Mukherjee – Gol Maal AKA Hanky Panky (1979)

Ramprasad is a recent college graduate who finds a job with a finicky man, Bhavani Shankar, who believes that a man without a mustache is a man without a character. Bhavani Shankar is also against any of his employees indulging in recreation of any kind. When Ramprasad is caught by his boss at a soccer match, he has to invent a twin brother, the clean-shaven Laxman Prasad, to save his job. When Bhavani’s daughter falls in love with the clean-shaven Laxman Prasad, and insists on marrying him, and Bhavani insists she should marry Ramprasad, things take a whacky turn. A fake mother and a hilarious chase are other enjoyable features involved in this comedy. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – Socrate (1971)

‘Socrates’ Mirrors the Platonic Touch of Rossellini
Something more than wordplay is involved when one describes Roberto Rossellini’s “Socrates,” which opened yesterday at the New Yorker Theater, as the great Italian director’s most Socratic film, in his most Platonic style.

Although the movie was shot entirely in Spain with lots of correctly costumed extras, who walk around what look to be the freshly painted, spruced-up remains of the sets of Anthony Mann’s unfortunate “Fall of the Roman Empire,” it concedes no more than it absolutely must to the demands of a popular cinema that seeks access to the intellect through visual grandeur and primal emotions. Read More »

Robert Dornhelm & Earle Mack – The Children of Theatre Street (1977)

This documentary provides a fascinating look at one of the world’s greatest schools of dance, the Kirov School in Leningrad, where renowned dancers such as Nijinsky, Karsavina, Anna Pavlova, Nureyev, Baryshnikov and Makarova have studied. This documentary provides a close-up look at the regimen these dedicated young dancers must follow in order to fulfill their dream of entering the company. Princess Grace of Monaco, a long-time dance enthusiast who supported ballet in her own principality, narrate the film. Read More »