Tag Archives: 1980s

Aki Kaurismäki – Hamlet liikemaailmassa AKA Hamlet Goes Business (1987)

Quote:
A bizarre black-and-white film noir reworking of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’. After the death of his father, young Hamlet inherits a seat on the board of a company controlled by his uncle that decides to move into the rubber duck market. But Hamlet is suspicious of the circumstances surrounding his father’s death… Read More »

Robin Anderson & Bob Connolly – Joe Leahy’s Neighbours [+ Extras] (1989)

This film is the follow-up to First Contact. It traces the fortunes of Joe Leahy, the mixed-race son of Australian explorer Michael Leahy, in his uneasy relationship with his tribal neighbours. Joe built his coffee plantation on land bought from the Ganiga in the mid 1970s. European educated, raised in the highlands of Papua, freed by his mixed race from the entanglements of tribal obligation, Joe leads a Western lifestyle governed by individualism and the pursuit of affluence. Read More »

Charlie Ahearn – Wild Style (1983)

Quote:
During the time when Hip Hop was being passed off as a fad that wouldn’t last beyond “Rapper’s Delight”, a vivid reenactment of the introduction of this artistic culture to the world was made. Wild Style is arguably the very first movie and definitely one of the very few that shows the true essence of what Hip Hop is about. Read More »

Aki Kaurismäki – Leningrad Cowboys Go America (1989)

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Somewhere in the tundra lives the worst rock and roll band in the world…. Aki Kaurismäki`s hilarious road movie follows the fortunes and misadventures of a struggling Siberian rock band, the Leningrad Cowboys.

A local promoter, stunned by the band`s lack of talent, advises them instead to try their luck in America. Accompanied by their autocratic manager, the Cowboys travel to New York, learning English on the plane. Sporting outsixe Quiffs, dark shades and outrageously long winkle-pickers, they are passed off as Americans. Jim Jarmusch, in a cameo role as a shifty car salesman, sells them an old Cadillac. The band strap their frozen bass player to the roof in a coffin full of beer, and head south…. Read More »

Mohsen Makhmalbaf – Dastforoush AKA The Peddler (1987)

Consisting of three separate stories, the director explores “Man” as a theme: birth, life and death, to present a sometimes comic, sometimes tragic portrait of life at the bottom of the socio-economic pile.

Review by Jonathan Rosenbaum:
An impressive, often powerful Iranian feature (1987, 95 min.) by Mohsen Makhmalbaf–who started out as an antishah activist and fiction writer–composed of three sketches dealing with the poor in Tehran (1987). The first, freely adapted from an Alberto Moravia story, follows the appalling misadventures of an impoverished couple with four crippled children as they try to get their fifth and latest child adopted, in the hope that she won’t wind up crippled as well. The second follows the equally pathetic life of a scatterbrained, spastic Jerry Lewis type who devotes his life to caring for his aged and senile mother. Read More »

Naoto Yamakawa – Pan’ya shuugeki AKA Attack on a Bakery (1985)

Two pals suffer from an insatiable hunger and decide to rob a local communist bakery run, occupied by a Wagner loving shop keep and a lone indecisive woman contemplating her next meal. Based on a short story by Haruki Murakami. Read More »

Bertrand Blier – Beau-père AKA Stepfather (1981)

Quote:
Remy is morose, nearing 30 with his career as a musician going nowhere and his eight-year marriage to Martine souring. Then, Martine dies in a car crash, and Marion, her 14-year-old, wants to stay rather than move to her father’s. Remy likes the idea: he loves her, he’s raised her, and she offers him emotional responsibility. Marion’s father objects, but she’s willful, so he relents. Soon, she tells Remy she finds him attractive, that she’s now “a woman,” and why can’t they be lovers. Remy is appalled, but weakens, missing her when she spends Christmas with her dad. What if they do become lovers? What next? And what if a woman more his age enters the picture? Read More »