Tag Archives: 2000s

Çagan Irmak – Ulak AKA The Messenger (2008)

Quote:
I am pretty sure Chagan Irmak was aware of the fact that the movie is completely different than what people was expecting. He is brave enough to discuss the issues like freedom of speech, military coups in his movies explicitly. But this time, he was indirect and he makes people to think. In most of the Turkish movies, it is a tradition to give the message in a direct way. But this makes Ulak special .. Irmak breaks those traditions. The photography, costumes are were great. Throughout the movie, I tried where/when the story takes place. What is their religion? I liked that disturbance in my mind. which make me to think and I enjoyed my mind trip! Read More »

Sang-soo Hong – Saenghwalui balgyeon aka Turning Gate (2002)

Synopsis :
Kyung-Soo (Kim Sang-Kyung, Lawyers) is an actor, but his last movie was a failure and he has just missed out on a new role. Disappointed and disgusted, he takes a trip to visit a friend and meets two very different women, Myung-Suk (Ye Ji-Won) and Sun-Young. Read More »

Christian Petzold – Jerichow (2008)

In Christian Petzold’s carefully crafted reworking of the ‘Postman Always Rings Twice’ story set in a desolate region of northeastern Germany, Ali (Hilmi Sözer) is a shrewd, well-off immigrant from Turkey. He’s married to Laura (Petzold favourite Nina Hoss), an attractive German woman whom he rescued from a bad past, and owns a string of snack bars. Life is placid, if a little joyless, until Ali makes the mistake of hiring disreputable ex-soldier Thomas (Benno Fürmann) as his driver. From then on, things are placid only on the surface… Read More »

Abbas Kiarostami – Five: Dedicated to Ozu (2003)

Quote:
Five sequences : 1) A piece of driftwood on the seashore, carried about by the waves 2) People walking on the seashore. The oldest ones stop by, look at the sea, then go away 3) Blurry shapes on a winter beach. A herd of dogs. A love story 4) A group of loud ducks cross the image, in one direction then the other 5) A pond, at night. Frogs improvising a concert. A storm, then the sunrise. Read More »

Rabah Ameur-Zaïmeche – Dernier maquis (2008)

Au fond d’une zone industrielle à l’agonie, Mao, un patron musulman, possède une entreprise de réparation de palettes et un garage de poids-lourds. Il décide d’ouvrir une mosquée et désigne sans aucune concertation l’imam…

Rabah Ameur-Zaïmeche has a way of framing shots that can make an industrial landscape look like an art project. The dominant images in Dernier Maquis are of rows of carefully stacked red pallets towering in a truck yard located on the outskirts of Paris, where most of the film takes place. Under the direction of Ameur-Zaïmeche, these unaesthetic objects become fascinating to contemplate. Since his visual approach exhibits so strong a sense of control, it is fitting that he cast himself as the company boss. The yard workers call the boss “Mao,” as his leadership style feigns benevolence to keep them from organizing for better wages. Read More »

Aisling Walsh – Song for a Raggy Boy (2003)

Based on Patrick Galvin’s memoir, ‘Song for a Raggy Boy’ is set in the grey, grim surroundings of a brutal Irish reform school in 1939. While the storyline has unmistakable parallels with ‘The Magdalene Sisters’, it deserves more than to be dismissed as this year’s indictment of religious orders. Read More »

Noah Baumbach – Margot at the Wedding [+ Extras] (2007)

Online review of film:
Eventually it may be that Noah Baumbach could turn into this country’s answer to France’s Eric Rohmer, turning out a steady diet of small, circumspect dramas about the lives and neurotic times of New York-era literary bourgeoisie. That’s one of the things that comes to mind as one takes in Margot at the Wedding, Baumbach’s fourth time out as writer/director and one that seems to set a template for the future. It’s a chill breeze of a film steeped in ugly inter-familial squabbling and the blinkered mentality of its self-absorbed characters who can generally only raise their gaze from their own navels long enough to find something lacking in the person they’re addressing. Read More »