Tag Archives: 2010s

Raj Amit Kumar – Unfreedom (2014)

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The movie that is BANNED in India.
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When a film is “banned” by the Censor Board of Film Certification, you know you are onto something. Well, that is exactly the case with Raj Amit Kumar’s film Unfreedom.

Homosexuality.

Islam.

Thinking outside of convention.

Unfreedom breaks all the “rules”.

The film follows two different lives, the storyline pivoting on a female same-sex relationship and the dangers of religious extremism. Read More »

Ester Amrami – Anderswo AKA Anywhere Else (2014)

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You left your home to move far away. You were struck by a wind of change and were unfaithful to yourself. You reinvented yourself and you are now feeling free. But suddenly pressure arises in you. Read More »

Yimou Zhang – Gui lai AKA Coming Home (2014)

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The story is adapted from the novel The Criminal Lu Yanshi (simplified Chinese: 陆犯焉识; traditional Chinese: 陸犯焉識) written by Yan Geling. Lu Yanshi had been a professor before being sent to the labour camp (laogai, literally “reform through labor”) during the Cultural Revolution. He escapes from the labour camp in faraway northwest Xining to make his way back to his long-missed wife Feng Wanyu and daughter Dandan. Dandan is a teenage ballerina, and is prevented from playing the lead role due to her father’s outlaw status. So when she stumbles across her father trying to hide in their apartment building to meet her mother, she reveals his presence to the police, and the police are therefore waiting to arrest him when he tries to meet his wife. Lu is captured, his wife is injured in the scuffle, and Dandan is awarded a supporting role in the ballet. After the end of the Cultural Revolution, Lu comes home to find his family broken: his wife suffers from amnesia resulting from her injury, and she blames Dandan for having reported her father, and meanwhile Dandan has given up ballet and works in a textile factory. Read More »

Joan Wilson – How To Remain Single (2015)

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A simple guide on how to end relationships before they begin. Read More »

Isamu Hirabayashi – Soliton (2014)

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A man walks, step by step, through the grass, first in black-and-white, later in pale colour. We see nothing of his face, just his boots and legs, clad in camouflage trousers and filmed from above. In the background we can hear machine guns rattling, a squawking walkie-talkie, the drone of an airplane attacking, a long beep and a chord played on the piano. The boots continue to stomp over grass, sand, rock, rusty metal and loose planks. Sometimes they come to a halt before walking on through clear, shallow water. More planks, metal, broken household items, rubble, a blanket, a bicycle, an air duct and a doll. Suddenly, the man’s boots are standing in front of the naked feet of a girl holding a cuddly toy in her hand. An atmospheric, experimental piece, from a country ravaged by catastrophes. Read More »

Roy Andersson – En duva satt på en gren och funderade på tillvaron AKA A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence (2014)

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Synopsis:
Like modern times’ Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, Sam and Jonathan, two travelling salesmen peddling novelty items, take us on a kaleidoscopic wandering through human destinies. A trip that shows us the beauty of single moments, the pettiness of others, the humour and tragedy that is in us, life’s grandeur as well as frailty of humanity. A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence was Awarded Golden Lion for Best Film at the 2014 Venice International Film Festival. Read More »

André Singer – Night Will Fall (2014)

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Synopsis:

When Allied forces liberated the Nazi concentration camps, their terrible discoveries were recorded by army cameramen, revealing for the first time the horror of what had happened.

Using British, Soviet and American footage, the Ministry of Information’s Sidney Bernstein collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock to make a film that would provide evidence of the Nazi’s unspeakable crimes. Yet, despite initial support from the British and US governments, the film was shelved. In this compelling documentary by André Singer (executive producer, The Act of Killing), the full story of the filming of the camps and the fate of Bernstein’s project, which has now been restored and completed by Imperial War Museums, can finally be told. Read More »