Tag Archives: Arabic

Yasmine Chouikh – Ila akher ezaman AKA Until the End of Time (2017)

In the cemetery of Sidi Boulekbour, Ali the old gravedigger meets the 60-year-old Johar, who is visiting her sister’s grave for the first time after losing her husband. Johar wants her final resting place to be next to her sister, so she decides to organize her own funeral and asks Ali to help her. But preparations for the final journey go awry when Ali and Johar unexpectedly start to realize they have feelings for each other… Read More »

Shahad Ameen – Sayyedat al-Bahr (2019)

Synopsis:
Set in a dystopian landscape, SCALES is the story of a young strong-willed girl, Hayat, who lives in a poor fishing village governed by a dark tradition in which every family must give one daughter to the sea creatures who inhabit the waters nearby. In turn the sea creatures are hunted by the men of the village. Saved from this fate by her father, Hayat is considered a curse on the village and grows up an outcast. Nevertheless, she does not surrender to this fate and fights for a place within her village. After her mother gives birth to a baby boy, Hayat must accept the brutal custom of giving herself to the sea creatures or finding a way to escape. Read More »

Moumen Smihi – El ayel AKA A Muslim Childhood (2005)

This film, the first in what has become a semi-autobiographical trilogy for Smihi, follows the everyday experiences of Mohamed-Larbi Salmi against the changing Moroccan society. In 1950s Tangier, Larbi Salmi is a young, timid, pre-teen, boy, trying to make sense of the gentle religious upbringing of his father, the secular education offered him in French school, and his budding desires for the forbidden pleasures of the cinema and the women he meets through it. All the while the film offers a tapestry of fifties Tangier, an international zone marked by the influence of Arab, Berber, European and American histories. ‘This film is dedicated,’ Smihi has stated, ‘to all those in the Arab world who cry out, “long live our freedom, all of our freedoms.”’ Read More »

Mohamed Khan – Awdat mowatin AKA Return of a Citizen (1986)

Return of a Citizen (Arabic: عودة مواطن‎, translit. Awdat mowatin) is a 1986 Egyptian drama film directed by Mohamed Khan. It was screened out of competition at the 1987 Cannes Film Festival.(wikipedia)

Chaker returns to Cairo from the Gulf a comfortably wealthy man, but there is no-one to meet him at the airport. at home he finds that all his family still live under one roof. His family start to fall apart around him, and he must decide whether to stay or leave.(BFI) Read More »

Radwan El-Kashef – Arak el-balah AKA Date Wine (1998)

Quote:
This Egyptian feature film has strong elements of both folktale and comedy, although its subject matter and final scenes are anything but funny. Set in southern Egypt, the film tells the story of a group of people who are led into the desert by a strong-minded man who wants them to live far from the greed and corruption of civilized society. Years later, when the leader has become old and weak, a mysterious visitor coaxes the men of the village away to work in the north where they can make a lot of money. Only the leader and his adolescent grandson Ahmed – who has no desire for wealth – are left in the village with the women and children. Read More »

Mostafa Derkaoui – Ahdate bila dalala AKA De quelques événements sans signification AKA About Some Meaningless Events (1974)

A team of filmmakers in search of a theme asks young residents of Casablanca about their expectations and their relationship to Moroccan cinema. When they witness a crime committed by a unsatisfied dock worker who accidentally kills his boss, they are interested in this particular case. The investigation of the motifs will encourage them to rethink their conception of cinema and the role of the artist in society.

Morocco’s government banned the film after its first and only screening in Paris, saying it was inappropriate for the Moroccan audience. Read More »

Suliman Elnour, Eltayeb Mahdi, Ibrahim Shaddad – Sudanese Film Group – Films by Suliman Elnour, Eltayeb Mahdi & Ibrahim Shaddad (1964-1989)

Quote:
Sudanese Film Group – Films by Suliman Elnour, Eltayeb Mahdi & Ibrahim Shaddad

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, a group of filmmakers working in the film department of the Ministry of Culture at the time published the magazine CINEMA. This group founded the Sudanese Film Group (SFG) in April 1989 in order to be able to act more independently of the state. Their aim was to be involved in all aspects of film production, screening and teaching and to maintain the Sudanese* passion for cinema. On 30 June 1989, however, the coup, which brought with it a distrust of all forms of art, ended all cultural endeavours. All civil society organisations were banned. In 2005 the firm hand of the state was finally loosened somewhat and SFG was able to register again. Read More »