Tag Archives: Bing Crosby

James Algar & Clyde Geronimi & Jack Kinney – The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949)

Quote:
Two stories. The Wind in the Willows: Concise version of Kenneth Grahame’s story of the same name. J. Thaddeus Toad, owner of Toad Hall, is prone to fads, such as the newfangled motor car. This desire for the very latest lands him in much trouble with the wrong crowd, and it is up to his friends, Mole, Rat and Badger to save him from himself. – The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Retelling of Washington Irving’s story set in a tiny New England town. Ichabod Crane, the new schoolmaster, falls for the town beauty, Katrina Van Tassel, and the town Bully Brom Bones decides that he is a little too successful and needs “convincing” that Katrina is not for him. Read More »

Hal Walker – Duffy’s Tavern (1945)

From original nfo:
“Duffy’s Tavern” was a hugely popular radio show of the 1940s and
early 1950s. When Ed Gardner decided to launch the program, he could
find no one that could speak New York bartender as well as he. So, he
cast himself in the lead as Archie the bartender. Each episode began
with Archie answering the telephone and saying, “Hello – Duffy’s
Tavern where the elite meet to eat, Archie the manager speakin’, Duffy
ain’t here. Oh, hellow Duffy.” As was not unusual for popular radio
shows of the time, Paramount contracted to bring “Duffy’s Tavern” to
film and this was the result. Archie mangles the language at every
turn and a full complement of Paramount stars is present to join in
the fun. The hightlights are energetic performances by Betty Hutton
and Cass Daley, as well as the closing number with Bing Crosby and his
family. Read More »

Leo McCarey – Going My Way (1944) (HD)

Synopsis:
A winner of seven Academy Awards®*, the irresistible Going My Way lights up the screen as beautifully as it warms up the heart. Bing Crosby shines as Father O’Malley, a young priest new to an established but financially troubled parish. When his philosophies conflict with those of the curmudgeonly Father Fitzgibbon (Barry Fitzgerald), the unflappable Father O’Malley perseveres — eventually winning over his gruff superior and the parish with his fresh, inspirational approach. Read More »

Stuart Heisler & Mark Sandrich – Blue Skies (1946)

Jed Potter looks back on a love triangle conducted over the course of years and between musical numbers. Dancer Jed loves showgirl Mary, who loves compulsive nightclub-opener Johnny, who can’t stay committed to anything in life for very long. Read More »

Mark Sandrich – Holiday Inn (1942)

Synopsis:
Lovely Linda Mason has crooner Jim Hardy head over heels, but suave stepper Ted Hanover wants her for his new dance partner after femme fatale Lila Dixon gives him the brush. Jim’s supper club, Holiday Inn, is the setting for the chase by Hanover and manager Danny Reed. The music’s the thing. Read More »