Boris Karloff

  • Various – Boris Karloff’s Thriller [Season 2] (1962)

    1961-1970ThrillerTVUSAVarious

    Thriller (aka. Boris Karloff’s Thriller) was an hour-long TV Horror anthology series that originally aired on NBC from 1960 to 1962. Horror fans who grew up in the 1960’s and 1970’s were nearly enraptured with the content and structure of this show. Indeed, in his non-fiction book on horror, Danse Macabre, Stephen King calls Thriller “the best horror series ever put on TV” (224; 1983 ed). At the beginning of each hour, Hollywood’s master of the macabre himself, Boris Karloff, would set the tone and prime the viewers for frightful and chilling dramatizations based on the works of some of the era’s greatest writers in the genre – writers like Robert E Howard, Cornell Woolrich, Richard Matheson, and Robert Bloch. Each episode was shot in eerie black and white and offered at least one story, with a few episodes dividing the hour between two or three shorter plays.Read More »

  • Various – Boris Karloff’s Thriller [Season 1] (1960)

    1951-1960ThrillerTVUSAVarious

    Thriller (aka. Boris Karloff’s Thriller) was an hour-long TV Horror anthology series that originally aired on NBC from 1960 to 1962. Horror fans who grew up in the 1960’s and 1970’s were nearly enraptured with the content and structure of this show. Indeed, in his non-fiction book on horror, Danse Macabre, Stephen King calls Thriller “the best horror series ever put on TV” (224; 1983 ed). At the beginning of each hour, Hollywood’s master of the macabre himself, Boris Karloff, would set the tone and prime the viewers for frightful and chilling dramatizations based on the works of some of the era’s greatest writers in the genre – writers like Robert E Howard, Cornell Woolrich, Richard Matheson, and Robert Bloch. Each episode was shot in eerie black and white and offered at least one story, with a few episodes dividing the hour between two or three shorter plays.Read More »

  • Terry O. Morse – British Intelligence (1940)

    1931-1940Terry O. MorseThrillerUSAWar

    Quote:
    Boris Karloff is Valder, the creepy looking but trusted French refugee butler of British cabinet minister Arthur Bennett (Holmes Herbert). Valder might be a German spy, but is posing as a British spy. Also sent to the Bennett household as a guest is Frances Hautry (Margaret Lindsay), who is posing as a German spy but might be a British spy. She was previously seen as nurse Helene von Lorbeer, working in a French hospital to treat Frank Bennett (Bruce Lester).Read More »

  • Henry Edwards – Juggernaut (1936)

    1931-1940Henry EdwardsMysteryUnited Kingdom

    Victor Sartorius (Karloff) is an ailing doctor working in Morocco. He teams up with Lady Yvonne Clifford (Mona Goya) in a plot to poison her husband, Sir Charles Clifford (Morton Selten), so he can collect the 20,000 pounds necessary to save his experiments and his funding. Roger Clifford (Arthur Margetson), the son of Sir Charles has also been marked for death. The only one who can stop the murder plot of Sartorius is Nurse Eve Rowe (Joan Wyndham).Read More »

  • Vernon Sewell – Curse of the Crimson Altar AKA The Crimson Cult (1968)

    1961-1970HorrorUnited KingdomVernon Sewell

    When his brother disappears, Robert Manning (Mark Eden) pays a visit to the remote country house he was last heard from. While his host Squire Morley (Christopher Lee, The Oblong Box) is welcoming, Manning detects a feeling of menace in the air with the legend of Lavinia (Barbara Steele, Black Sunday), the Black Witch of Greymarsh, hanging over everything. Will the village`s renowned expert on witchcraft, Professor John Marsh (Boris Karloff, Black Sabbath), be able to shed light on the wicked going-ons at The Craxted Lodge? Vernon Sewell (Ghost Ship) directs this nightmarish horror classic based on H.P. Lovecraft’s Dream in the Witch House.Read More »

  • Robert Stevenson – The Man Who Changed His Mind (1936)

    Robert Stevenson1931-1940ClassicsHorrorUnited Kingdom

    Dr. Laurence, a once-respectable scientist, begins to research the origin of the mind and the soul. The science community rejects him, and he risks losing everything for which he has worked. He begins to use his discoveries to save his research and further his own causes, thereby becoming… a Mad Scientist, almost unstoppable…Read More »

  • Roger Corman – The Raven (1963)

    USA1961-1970FantasyHorrorRoger Corman

    The Raven (1963) Quote:
    In this tongue-in-cheek movie inspired by Poe’s poem, Dr. Craven is the son of a great sorcerer (now dead) who was once himself quite skilled at that profession, but has since abandoned it. One evening, a cowardly fool of a magician named Bedlo comes to Craven for help- the evil Scarabus has turned him into a raven and he needs someone to change him back. He also tells the reluctant wizard that Craven’s long-lost wife Lenore, whom he loved greatly and thought dead, is living with the despised Scarabus.Read More »

  • James Whale – Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

    1931-1940ClassicsHorrorJames WhaleUSA

    Dr. Frankenstein and his monster both turn out to be alive, not killed as previously believed. Dr. Frankenstein wants to get out of the evil experiment business, but when a mad scientist, Dr. Pretorius, kidnaps his wife, Dr. Frankenstein agrees to help him create a new creature, a woman, to be the companion of the monster.Read More »

  • Lew Landers – The Raven [+commentaries] (1935)

    1931-1940ClassicsHorrorLew LandersUSA

    The Raven 1935 Synopsis:
    A wealthy judge coaxes the brilliant but eccentric neurological surgeon Dr. Vollin (Lugosi), who also has an obsessive penchant for Edgar Allen Poe, out of retirement to save the life of his daughter, a dancer crippled and brain damaged in an auto wreck. Vollin restores her completely, but also envisions her as his “Lenore,” and cooks up a scheme to kidnap the woman and torture and kill her fiance’ and father in his Poe-inspired dungeon. To do his dirty work, Vollin recruits a wanted criminal (Karloff), and turns him into a hideous monster to guarantee his subservience.Read More »

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