Tag Archives: Buster Crabbe

Ford Beebe – Red Barry (1938)

Quote:
“Red Barry” was the 40th sound-era serial produced by Universal Pictures (followed “Flaming Frontiers” and preceded “Scouts To the Rescue”), and was based in the Will Gould comic strip distributed to newspapers by King Features Syndicated, Inc. It was the third of five serials from Universal starring Buster Crabbe, and while the plot only revolves around two million dollars in bonds and soon evolves into a game of “Bonds, Bonds, Who Has the Bonds?”, it has so many groups, and their armies of henchmen, acquiring and re-acquiring the bonds that, in a chapter or two, the people who have the bonds don’t appear to know they are the current holders. Wing Fu (Cyril Delevanti), brings the bonds to the USA to buy war planes for an unnamed county, and quickly loses them to Quong Lee (Frank Lackteen), a Eurasian underworld chief, but they are re-taken in chapter two by Red Barry (Buster Crabbe). Ballet dancer Natacha (Edna Sedgwick), representing a ruthless group of Russians, acquires them in chapter three, but Barry gets them back in chapter four. Read More »

Erle C. Kenton – You’re Telling Me! (1934)

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Synopsis from Allmovie.com
W.C. Fields stars in a remake of his silent comedy So’s Your Old Man. Fields plays Sam Bisbee, an erstwhile inventor who is the laughingstock of his small town. Returning in defeat from a disastrous big-city demonstration of his latest invention, Sam makes the acquaintance of a beautiful young woman (Adrienne Ames) who happens to be an incognito foreign princess. After Bisbee tells her of how he’d like to be a success for the sake of his family, the princess decides to use her celebrity to Sam’s benefit. She arrives in his town and lets it be known of her high regard for the downtrodden Bisbee. Suddenly Sam is the town’s big shot, enabling him to merchandise his inventions and do right by his wife and daughter. Sam earns the respect he’s so long deserved–but he’s never completely convinced that the princess is who she claims to be, and keeps congratulating her on her “racket.” Based on a story by Julian Street, You’re Telling Me is climaxed by a sidesplitting recreation of W.C. Fields’ Ziegfeld Follies golf routine. ~ Hal Erickson Read More »