Tag Archives: Charlotte Gainsbourg

Claude Berri – L’Un reste, l’autre part AKA One Stays, the Other Leaves (2005)

“I try to make films that move people when they are in the theater and make them think only after they leave.” Claude Berri

L’un reste, L’autre part is the story of two old time friends, both in their fifties, both married, who fall for two younger women. The cast is nothing less than stellar: Daniel Auteuil, Nathalie Baye, Pierre Arditi, Miou-Miou and Charlotte Gainsbourg

Attal’s real-life wife, Charlotte Gainsbourg, appears as one of two romantic foils a character drama in which over-middle-age men fall in love with younger women and must confront the ramifications of ending their marriages (one does and one doesn’t, or so the title would have you believe). Read More »

Benoît Jacquot – 3 coeurs AKA Three Hearts (2014)

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More than 40 years ago, at the outset of his filmmaking career, Benoit Jacquot worked as an assistant director to the great French novelist and helmer Marguerite Duras, and now, with “Three Hearts,” he has made a film that feels more indebted to her romantic values than anything else in his oeuvre. Here, beneath the surface of a cool, contempo love triangle involving a Parisian man (Benoit Poelvoorde) and a pair of provincial French sisters (played by Charlotte Gainsbourg and Chiara Mastroianni), are all the values Duras held dear: love at first sight, spontaneous tears, all-consuming desire and impossible, self-destructive decisions. Read More »

Jacques Doillon – Amoureuse AKA Lover (1992)

‘An expectant mother begins to question the identity of her unborn child’s father after entering into an extramarital affair with her sister’s lover. Marie and Antoine are living together and deeply in love when Marie voices her desire to become a mother. Unfortunately for Marie, Antoine has no interest in starting a family. Shortly thereafter, Marie meets Paul, and coolly rejects his advances. But later, when Paul begins sleeping with Marie’s sister Juliette, Marie realizes that he may in fact be the man of her dreams. Subsequently alternating between Antoine and Paul as she wrestles with her nagging conscience, Marie later learns she is pregnant and realizes that she can’t be certain which of her lovers is the father.” allmovie Read More »

Bertrand Blier – Merci la vie AKA Thanks for Life (1991)

Synopsis:
Camille, a naive schoolgirl meets an intiguing influence in Joelle, a slightly older and much more experienced spirit. Camille follows her new friend through the discovery of sex and the darker side of life. As the film progresses Camille discovers Aids and the fear that she may have picked up the disease in her early encounters. Read More »

Gaspar Noé – Lux Æterna AKA Lumiere Eternelle (2019)

Two actresses, Béatrice Dalle and Charlotte Gainsbourg, are on a film set telling stories about witches – but that’s not all. ‘Lux Æterna’ is also an essay on cinema, the love of film, and on-set hysterics.
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I think this film is admirable in many ways although not devoid of flaws, the main one being that for the nth time, Noé pulls the same expectable tricks with colorful lighting, flickering images and references to his classics (even just the title, “Lux Aeterna” is the György Ligeti eerie choir piece used in “2001: A Space Odyssey”), etc. So that does get a little unimaginative, especially since the atmosphere and development are very close to his latest long feature, “Climax”. Read More »

Serge Gainsbourg – Charlotte for Ever (1986)

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Stan, screeplay writer, had his time of glory in Hollywood. Today, alcoholic with a certain envy for suicide, his only link to life is his daughter, Charlotte. Read More »

Agnès Varda – Kung-fu master! (1988)

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Aesthetically, Agnès Varda’s two 1988 features, Jane B. par Agnes V. and Kung-Fu Master!, are diametrically opposed, but they’re linked by the showcase opportunities that they provide actress, singer, and model Jane Birkin. Kung-Fu Master! is, on its surface at least, a straightforward drama, one that concerns a middle-aged single mother, Mary-Jane (Birkin), finding herself smitten by her adolescent daughter’s classmate, Julien (Mathieu Demy). But like any story about this kind of subject matter, the simplicity of the setup belies the moral and emotional quandary it underpins. Even the midlife crisis suggested by Mary-Jane’s infatuation must be viewed within the context of the pressure that society, not internal doubt, places on women who turn 40. Read More »