Tag Archives: Christine Boisson

Gilles Béhat – Rue barbare AKA Barbarous Street (1984)

In this run-of-the-mill crime drama, Bernard Giraudeau is Daniel Chetman, someone who wants to leave the life of violence he knew in his neighborhood — and cannot do so because his nemesis, a strutting street gangster now involved with organized crime, continues to terrorize the inhabitants of Chetman’s turf. After much spilled blood, a parade of ugly underground types, and various sexual scenes, Chetman reduces the forces of evil to a reasonable level of opposition — but who knows if the neighborhood will be different in the end. Read More »

Daniel Schmid – Jenatsch (1987)

Quote:
A journalist is assigned to interview an eccentric anthropologist who has exhumed the skeleton of Jörg Jenatsch, a revered freedom fighter who was mysteriously murdered in 1639. Initially disinterested, the journalist begins to uncover unflattering truths about the national hero and experiences visions in which he seems to be witnessing events that transpired over 300 years ago. As he obsessively pursues the investigation, his personal life and his grip on reality disintegrate, drawing him relentlessly toward the fatal carnival at which Jenatsch was killed. Read More »

René Manzor – Le passage AKA The Passage (1986)

In one of the oddest personifications of Death found in the cinema or elsewhere, first-time director (Rene Manzor) creates a Grim Reaper with his own control room, replete with high-tech wizardry in this sci-fi drama. Jean Diaz (Alain Delon) is a filmmaker working on an animated feature that would speak out against violence, when he is suddenly killed in an accident. Diaz comes around after death only to face Death personified, who wants to strike a bargain with him. Diaz can return to life if he agrees to make his film according to Death’s plan for the annihilation of the human race. If Diaz does not agree to these terms, then his young son — now in a coma from the accident — will also die. Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Liberté, la nuit (1983)

a title with a comma in the middle for a film divided in two parts. A film in black and white with a dark side and a jovial side. The first part of the title evokes politics, as the story recalls the days of the Algerian War of Independence; the second part represents the mood that hovers over the eminently painful images. There isn’t even a hint of daylight in the freedom of the title. It only lives metaphorically in the darkness and languor of the night. — description by Violeta Kovacsics in the book “Philippe Garrel: Filmmaking Revealed” Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Liberté, la nuit (1984) (HD)

‘Liberte, la nuit’ is not really a political film, or, at least, a film about politics. Its central figures are an aging revolutionary helping Algerians in the anti-colonial war against France, his separated wife, a dressmaker who gives them guns, and his mistress, a French Algerian emigree. Such a set-up might offer opportunities for allegory – white Algeria returning to the aging bosom of the fatherland, and all that. The film’s most dynamic sequence is pure political thriller, an assassination by the OAS, confusingly shot and edited on grainy stock that evokes both documentary immediacy and the whirring of a surveillance camera, complete with exciting car chase. The human relationships – especially the drawn-out separation of Jean and Mouche, are said to be caused by his political activity, while his contact with others has some basis in his ‘work’. Even, as I say, his final escape with an apolitical menial has political overtones; and their idyll is ultimately no escape from history. Read More »