D.W. Griffith

  • D.W. Griffith – Judith of Bethulia (1914)

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    Judith of Bethulia was a 1914 film and starred Blanche Sweet and Henry B. Walthall, and was produced and directed by D. W. Griffith in 1913. This was the first feature-length film made by pioneering film company Biograph, although the second that Biograph released. Shortly after its completion and a disagreement Griffith had with Biograph executives on making more future feature-length films, Griffith left Biograph, and took the entire stock company with him. Biograph delayed the picture’s release until 1914, after Griffith’s departure, so that it would not have to pay him in a profit-sharing agreement they had.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – Home, Sweet Home (1914)

    John Howard Payne leaves home and begins a career in the theater. Despite encouragement from his mother and his sweetheart, Payne begins to lead a life of dissolute habits, and this soon leads to ruin and misery. In deep despair, he thinks of better days, and writes a song that later provides inspiration to several others in their own times of need.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – Isn’t Life Wonderful (1924)

    Producer/director D.W. Griffith’s feature is a fairly realistic study of the deprivations visited on the German people after their defeat in World War I. In her best-ever performance, Griffith protégée Carol Dempster plays Inga, who does her best to hold her family together and keep food on the table despite grinding poverty, debilitating illness and out-of-control inflation. The most memorable scene finds Inga desperately trying to maneuver a basketful of near-worthless Deutschmarks to a market before the prices rise again and she is unable to buy meat. Aware that anti-German sentiment still prevailed in the US, Griffith cannily inserted an opening title which noted that the main characters were Polish.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – The Massacre (1912)

    As the woman he loved lay dying, the former suitor swore to protect the child of the other man, just killed in battle. The baby grown to womanhood, the man’s love for the mother was felt again, but a stranger claimed the girl’s love. So the man with his trust left for the far Northwestern country and joined in the government wars against the Indians. There again he met the life which he had sworn to protect. How well he succeeded, the returning young husband could most appreciate, after one of the most deadly massacres and Indian battles of the period.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – The Lesser Evil (1912)

    A young woman’s peaceful existence is shattered when she is abducted by the crew of a boat of smugglers, who then also turn against their captain.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – Friends (1912)

    At the mining-camp of Golden Creek, the little orphan girl of the late proprietor of Golden Creek Inn is the pet of all the miners. Her father had long been their great friend and adviser, and hence his little daughter always commanded their greatest respect. She becomes greatly infatuated with Dandy Jack, who is considered by all as her sweetheart. Jack decides to leave the camp for other diggings, and the little one is almost heartbroken. As he is leaving, he meets Bob, his old chum, who has just arrived at the camp. Their greeting shows clearly the value of that little word “friends.” Later on, Bob comes to the Inn and falls deeply in love with the little orphan, who has realized by this time that her feeling for Jack was infatuation rather than love. Hence she and Bob are engaged to be married. Shortly before the day set for the wedding, Jack returns and is twitted by the boys about the apparently fickle girl, whereupon he wagers that he can win her back, not knowing, of course, who the successful suitor is. The outcome is a revelation to all.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – The Last Drop of Water (1911)

    A wagon train heading west across the great desert runs out of water, and is attacked by Indians. One man — their last hope — is sent out to find water.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – Orphans of the Storm [B&W] (1921)

    Just prior to the French Revolution, Henriette takes step-sister Louise to Paris in hopes of curing her blindness. Lustful aristocrat de Praille has virginal Henriette abducted and brought to his estate, leaving Louise helpless in the big city. An honorable aristocrat (Schildkraut) helps Henriette escape from de Praille. Scoundrel Mother Frochard forces Louise to beg in the streets. Unable to find Louise, Henriette gives shelter to admirable politician Danton after he’s attacked, and she also runs afoul of radical revolutionary Robespierre.Read More »

  • D.W. Griffith – The Battle of Elderbush Gulch (1913)

    On the day of the dog feast at the Indian encampment, the waifs arrived at Elderbush Gulch. Their pet pups came with them. ‘”Now we eat,” said the chief’s son, when he saw the pup’s fat little hides, but he met his death instead. “The blood of the whites,” cried the red men, and all on account of two small dogs, the settlement at Elderbush Gulch was wiped from the map. Yet many strong hearts lived to tell the tale, along with the dogs, the waifs and the baby.Read More »

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