Tag Archives: David Warner

Karel Reisz – Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966)

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From Karel Reisz, the renowned director of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Night Must Fall, Isadora, The Gambler, Who’ll Stop the Rain, The French Lieutenant’s Woman and Sweet Dreams, comes this cult classic starring screen great Vanessa Redgrave (Julia, Mary, Queen of Scots) and legendary character actor David Warner (Cross of Iron, Perfect Friday) in one of his few starring roles. A gorilla-fixated artist with distinctly anarchist tendencies, Morgan (Warner) tries to regain the affections of his divorced wife Leonie (Redgrave) by variously kidnapping her, attempting to blow up her future mother-in-law and attacking her fiancé (Robert Stephens, Sherlock Holmes of Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes). Cut with scenes from King Kong and Tarzan films, Morgan’s depiction of madness, dark humor and vintage performances made it one of the wildest, funniest and most provocative comedies of the ’60s. Nominated for two Oscars: Best Actress in a Leading Role (Redgrave) and Best Costume Design, Black-and-White (Jocelyn Rickards). Read More »

Neil Jordan – The Company of Wolves (1984)

The story unfolds as young Rosaleen lies dreaming in her bed. A violent nightmare transports her back in time to a world of primeval forests and werewolves. In this netherworld she learns that her only sister has been killed by a wolf. Her Granny weaves vivid tales of folklore and fantasy with warnings of fantastic beasts that lurk within men and foretelling the fate of all young girls who stray from the path… Read More »

Jack Gold – The Bofors Gun [+Extras] (1968)

A drama set in post-war Germany. A small detachment of British National Servicemen faces
internal strife and a meltdown of Army discipline. Read More »

Daryush Shokof – Seven Servants (1996)

AMG: A very strange dream about a wealthy man preparing for death inspired director Daryush Shokof to make this off-beat and highly esoteric art film. Archie (Anthony Quinn) receives inner peace by being touched by people of four different racial groups. The film shows the five of them conducting daily activities as Quinn endures having their fingers in his nose and ears constantly for 10 days. Archie invites two old friends of his to be present at his death and reveals his secret for inner peace to them. The man goes off in a huff, but the woman stays around and finds her own enjoyment in the situation. Read More »