Tag Archives: Emily Watson

Jim Loach – Oranges and Sunshine (2010)

An Icon Film Distribution (in Australia/U.K.) release of a Screen Australia, Little Gaddelsden presentation of a Sixteen Films/See-Saw Prods. production, in association with Fulcrum Media France, EM Media, South Australian Film Corp., Deluxe, Screen NSW, BBC Films. (International sales: Icon Entertainment, London.) Produced by Camilla Bray, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning. Executive producers, Rebecca O’Brien, Arnab Banerji. Directed by Jim Loach. Screenplay, Rona Munro, based on the book”Empty Cradles” by Margaret Humphreys. Read More »

Stephen Hopkins – The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2004)

There can be fewer people in the film world who embody the moniker ‘flawed genius’ better than Peter Sellers. Adored throughout the world for his hilarious comic creations – not least Inspector Clouseau – the ‘real’ Sellers was wracked with private torment and a chronic lack of confidence. It’s a curious balance which director Stephen Hopkins exploits to lift The Life and Death of Peter Sellers above the usual biopic fare. Read More »

Alan Rudolph – Trixie (2000)

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IMDB:
Emily Watson stars as Trixie, an eccentric woman who aspires to quit her job as a security guard and become a private detective. However, comedy intervenes and the mess begins…
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John Hillcoat – The Proposition (2005)


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Nick Cave’s essay in the true and tried Western format, shows how a harsh land (Colonial Australia) brutalizes the men who try and conquer it. Yet this tale has passages of lyricism that counterpoint the sudden moments of savagery. It is a very gritty often grisly picture of 19th Century Australia, warts and all, right down to swarms of blowflies. Perhaps the sadistic violence gets a bit over the top especially towards the end, but thanks to a fine cast, crisp direction, and the scorched cinematography it generally works. A standout performance in a minor role by John Hurt rather steals the show, while Ray Winstone and Emily Watson are particularly sensitive together. One suspects the harsh conditions are somewhat overstated for dramatic purposes, though the story is supposedly based on fact. Tombstone Territory never looked as unpleasant as this. It is certainly one of the most interesting period dramas made in Australia. (imdb) Read More »