Tag Archives: Fernando Rey

Andrea Bianchi & Jesús Franco – Commando Mengele AKA Angel of Death (1987)

A Jewish commando unit hunting Nazi war criminals tracks down the infamous Dr. Mengele in the jungle, and find that he is torturing nubile young virgins and performing horrible medical experiments on the locals. They prepare to battle their way past Mengele’s hordes of fanatic Nazi bodyguards in order to get to him. Read More »

Manuel Mur Oti – Cielo negro AKA Black Sky (1951) (HD)

A woman who works as employee in a fashion store has to care for her ill mother. At the same time she falls in love with a bohemian man. Read More »

Pierre Grimblat – Dites-le avec des fleurs aka Say It with Flowers (1974)

Synopsis:
In this bizarre psychological thriller, a handsome young boy (John Mouder-Brown), who is marred by a strange birthmark on his face, tells a disturbing tale about how his family died. The family had been living for some time in a villa which was overgrown with flowering vines. Some of the vines even penetrate to the inside of the house. It seems that the boy’s father, (Fernando Rey), was part of a conspiracy to kill Hitler, and when the plot failed, he was forced to kill his family in order to prevent them from suffering horrible torture. Unable for some reason to kill himself, he escaped but became the victim of amnesia after a motorcycle accident. When a German governess came to stay, his father’s memory is revived. The boy travels to Germany in pursuit of the governess and learns that her family seeks vengeance from his father. Read More »

Frank Perry – Monsignor (1982)

From nytimes.com

Brash, handsome, ruthless, reckless, ambitious, brilliant and corrupt: these are the thrillingly paper thin qualities undoubtedly possessed by Father John Flaherty in the novel upon which ”Monsignor” is based. As played by a more or less real person (Christopher Reeve), Father Flaherty cannot help but lose some of his two-dimensional luster. Read More »

Rafael Gil – Don Quijote de la Mancha (1947)

Quote:
The first sound film version in Spanish of the great classic novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. A huge undertaking for Spanish cinema in its day, it was the longest film version of the novel up to that time, and very likely the most faithful, reverently following the book in its dialogue and order of episodes. Read More »

Robert Altman – Quintet (1979)

The Harvard Film Archive writes:
A rare science fiction foray from Altman, Quintet is set in a future ice age where people in an otherwise barren society gather with religious zeal to play a mysterious board game that is suddenly transformed into a life-or-death struggle by corrupt, power-hungry officials. With beautifully dystopian winter vistas filmed in the Arctic Circle and on the site of Montreal’s former Expo ’67 complex, the all-encompassing alternate reality of Quintet offers no comfort or solace. However, it is the hopeless darkness that makes any sign of humanity shockingly foreign and blindingly bright and perhaps helps explain why Altman later remarked, regarding the film’s poor critical response, “I have this great optimism that always translates into pessimism.” Read More »

Sergio Corbucci – Vamos a matar, compañeros AKA Companeros (1970)

Synopsis:
Arms dealer Yolaf Peterson aims to make a sale to guerilla Mongo, but the money is locked in a bank safe, the combination known only to Professor Xantos, a prisoner of the Americans. Yolaf agrees to free Xantos, accompanied by reluctant guerilla Basco, but a former business partner of Yolaf’s- John ‘The Wooden Hand’, has other ideas. Read More »