Tag Archives: Françoise Arnoul

Julien Duvivier – Le Diable et les Dix Commandements AKA The Devil and the Ten Commandments (1962)

Quote:
The multi-part film is a difficult kind of cinema to get right but Duvivier’s Le Diable et les dix commandements is a rare exception where the form succeeds admirably. The film consists of seven roughly 15 minute sketches, each showing what may happen if one or more of the Ten Commandments is broken. Each sketch is self-contained (except for the last which returns to the first) and linked by a nasty slithery serpent who has a very strange sense of humour. The sketches are either mini-dramas, usually with a clever twist at the end (the best instance of this being the second sketch: “Do not commit adultery”), or comic. The sketch featuring “Do no steal” is an outrageous comic farce with Jean-Claude Brialy and Louis de Funès, made even more hilarious by Duvivier’s unsubtle attempt to ape the New Wave film directors. Read More »

Pierre Chenal – La bête à l’affût AKA Beast at Bay (1959)

User Review by dbdumonteil
Pierre Chenal’s last hurrah-although not his last movie, it’s easily the best of the four thrillers he made when he was back from Argentina. “Jeux Dangereux” the precedent year suggested a return to form for a director who made interesting film noirs in the thirties and a masterpiece in the forties (“La Foire Aux Chimères”). All promises were fulfilled in “La Bete A L’Affut” . Read More »

Emil E. Reinert – Quai de Grenelle AKA The Strollers (1950)

Synopsis:
‘Jean-Louis catches vipers he sells to the laboratories. A trivial incident causes his descent into hell: he forgets to use the pedestrian crossing and the policeman is cross. Who could have believed then where it would lead the unfortunate Jean-Louis to? Two unscrupulous journalists depict him as a monster, who releases vipers in town. Because of a hold up, the city is looking for a scapegoat, and this poor lad looks the part too much. Although the superintendent insists there’s really nothing against him, Jean-Louis becomes paranoiac and hides in shady places. He leaves his girlfriend, meets a hooker and a shifty aging man…’
– dbdumonteil Read More »

Henri Decoin – La chatte aka The Cat (1958)

Synopsis: Paris 1943. After her husband’s death, killed by the Germans, Cora joins the résistance under the pseudonym “La Chatte” (the she-cat). Very skillfully she succeeds in a dangerous mission. The same evening she meets a Swiss journalist, Bernard, and falls in love with him. Bernard is a German officer who now has to decide between his love for Cora and his mission. Read More »

Jean Cocteau – Le testament d’Orphée, ou ne me demandez pas pourquoi! AKA Testament of Orpheus (1960) (HD)

In his last film, legendary writer/artist/filmmaker Jean Cocteau portrays an 18th-century poet who travels through time on a quest for divine wisdom. In a mysterious wasteland, he meets several symbolic phantoms that bring about his death and resurrection. With an eclectic cast that includes Pablo Picasso, Jean-Pierre Leáud, Jean Marais and Yul Brynner, Testament of Orpheus (Le Testament de Orphée) brings full circle the journey Cocteau began in The Blood of a Poet, an exploration of the torturous relationship between the artist and his creations. Read More »

Jean Renoir – French Cancan (1955)

Synopsis:
Henri Danglard, proprietor of the fashionable (but bankrupt) cafe ‘Le Paravent Chinois’ featuring his mistress, belly dancer Lola, goes slumming in Montmarte (circa 1890) where the then-old-fashioned cancan is still danced. There, he conceives the idea of reviving the cancan as the feature of a new, more popular establishment…and meets Nini, a laundress and natural dancer, whom he hopes to star in his new show. But a tangled maze of jealousies intervenes… Read More »

Jean Cocteau – Le testament d’Orphée, ou ne me demandez pas pourquoi! AKA Testament of Orpheus (1960)

Synopsis
“Criterion” wrote:
In his last film, legendary writer/artist/filmmaker Jean Cocteau portrays an 18th-century poet who travels through time on a quest for divine wisdom. In a mysterious wasteland, he meets several symbolic phantoms that bring about his death and resurrection. With an eclectic cast that includes Pablo Picasso, Jean-Pierre Leáud, Jean Marais and Yul Brynner, Testament of Orpheus (Le Testament de Orphée) brings full circle the journey Cocteau began in The Blood of a Poet, an exploration of the torturous relationship between the artist and his creations. Read More »