Tag Archives: George A. Romero

George A. Romero – Knightriders (1981)

“allmovie” wrote:
Knightriders may well be the only cycle flick ever to be played out in suits of armor. A hardcase motorcycle gang led by Ed Harris has found itself a neat money-making gimmick. Dressed as the knights of the round table, the cyclists pick up a few bucks at local “renaissance” fairs, selling handicrafts made by the more talented members of the gang. Harris’ great rival is Tom Savini, who has his own band of “black knights.” Keep an eye out for a chucklesome unbilled bit by novelist Stephen King. Read More »

George A. Romero – Season of the Witch AKA Hungry Wives (1972)

Quote:
George Romero’s name may be synonymous with the living dead subgenre, but his filmography is far richer and more varied than his reputation as “the zombie guy” would suggest. Following the breakout success of his debut feature Night of the Living Dead, the director would embark upon a series of projects which demonstrate a master filmmaker with more than mere gut-munching on his mind.

Season of the Witch (released theatrically as Hungry Wives) follows the exploits of Joan Mitchell – a housewife who seeks to escape the confines of her humdrum suburban existence through a flirtation with witchcraft. Read More »

George A. Romero – Martin [+commentary] (1977)

Synopsis:
George Romero does for vampires what he has already done to zombies – an intense and realistic treatment that follows the exploits of Martin, who claims to be 84 years old, and who certainly drinks human blood. The boy arrives in Pittsburgh to stay with his cousin, who promises to save Martin’s soul and destroy him once he is finished, but Martin’s loneliness finds other means of release. Read More »

George A. Romero – Dawn of the Dead (1978)

George Romero’s 1979 sequel to Night of the Living Dead is a more accomplished and more knowing film, tapping into two dark and dirty fantasies–wholesale slaughter and wholesale shopping–to create a grisly extravaganza with an acute moral intelligence.
The graphic special effects (which sometimes suggest a shotgun Jackson Pollock) are less upsetting than Romero’s way of drawing the audience into the violence.
As four survivors of the zombie war barricade themselves inside a suburban shopping mall, our loyalties and human sympathies are made to shift with frightening ease.
Romero’s sensibility approaches the Swiftian in its wit, accuracy, excess, and profound misanthropy. Read More »