Tag Archives: Geraldine Chaplin

Herbert Vesely – Der Kurze Brief zum langen Abschied aka Short Letter to the Long Farewell (1978)

Here is a Peter Handke Adaptation from the 70s featuring Geraldine Chaplin and Music by Brian Eno.
about the novel:
In ”Short Letter, Long Farewell,” a German playwright is pursued by his wife, an actress, who wants to kill him. They scramble across the United States – Providence, New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Tucson, northern Oregon – to California, where they meet the director John Ford, who utters sage advice that enables them to part in peace. The novel is full of vivid snapshots of American characters and scenes, and the idiosyncratic mixture of narrative, interior monologue, natural description and cultural themes and cliches is a brilliant concoction. Read More »

Michael Campus – Z.P.G. AKA Zero Population Growth [+ Commentary] (1972)

In the not too distant future, a very smoggy and overpopulated Earth government makes it illegal to have children for a generation. One couple, unsatisfied with their substitute robot baby, breaks the rules and gets in a lot of trouble. Read More »

Alan Rudolph – Welcome to L.A. (1976)

The lives and romantic entanglements of a group of young adults who have achieved “overnight” success in Los Angeles. Read More »

Carlos Saura – La madriguera AKA Honeycomb (1969)

Synopsis:
‘Teresa and Pedro have been married for five years and are settled in a routine, and a rather sterile home. He manages – and possibly owns – a factory, while she is a lady of leisure. The arrival of a collection of furniture from Teresa’s childhood family home triggers a nightmare and subsequent sleepwalking, followed by regressive and childish behaviour. Teresa replaces their furniture (in keeping with the modern – verging on Brutalist – architecture of their house) with what has arrived, which is distinctly different in style (dark wood and richly coloured fabrics). The film then settles into a series of extended role play ‘games’ between husband and wife that gradually get out of hand.’
– Rebecca Naughten Read More »

Tom Gries – The Hawaiians AKA Master of the Islands (1970)

The intertwined lives of two kindred souls with ambition begins when Captain Whip Hoxworth discovers that Nyuk Tsin has been smuggled aboard as part of cargo on The Carthaginian, which he captains, a cargo supposed to consist of only male Chinese workers bound for Hawaii. Nyuk Tsin was kidnapped from her Haaka village to be sold to a Honolulu brothel. She is spared when Mun Ki claims she is his wife, and Hoxworth goes along with his wife’s suggestion that they can work in the Hoxworth household as domestic servants. Nyuk Tsin becomes known to all as Wu Chow’s Auntie (Aunt of Five Continents) when her five sons are named after continents (with Mun Ki’s wife in China regarded as their official mother). Whip founds an empire in pineapples, using Japanese laborers, after smuggling his first seed crop from French Guiana as Wu Chow’s Auntie grows a family business in Honolulu around her sons. Read More »

Serge Korber – Sur un arbre perché AKA Perched On A Tree (1971)

Politician get hitch hikers on road and in one car accident they all end up on a tree above the sea.

Quote:
Henri Roubier is an industrialist who has negotiated a contract to build a national roadway, making himself a rich man in the process. On his way to a meeting with the French Prime Minister, he gets caught up in a traffic jam and two hitch-hikers force their way into his car – a young man and a young woman, who have just met. Roubier drives off at great speed – but his car goes over the edge of a cliff. Read More »

David Lean – Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Eastman Museum writes:
An epic romance of doomed love, Doctor Zhivago is set amidst the tumultuous years encompassing World War I, the Russian Revolution of 1917, and the Russian Civil War. Yuri Zhivago (Omar Sharif) is a married physician and poet who falls madly in love with Lara (Julie Christie), a nurse who is also married. The tangled epic of love and war “did nothing less than re-create Moscow and its countryside,” according to Roger Ebert. “Doctor Zhivago,” Ebert continues, “believes that history should have a lot of room for personal feelings . . . the individual over the state, the heart over the mind.” Banned in the Soviet Union for decades, Doctor Zhivago won five of the ten Academy Awards for which it was nominated and has continued to garner acclaim ever since. Read More »