Tag Archives: Hans-Jürgen Syberberg

Hans-Jürgen Syberberg – Sex-Business – Made in Pasing (1969)

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The topic of the film is Alois Brummer, a likeable and inoffensive man from Lower Bavaria, a sex film producer. A man, small and round in stature, unusually active, with a nose for the market, dealing in films and girls in his own special manner in Bavaria – as another man would deal in used cars. There are worse things in our market-oriented society and in film as well. The film describes a forgotten or neglected form of triviality. Read More »

Hans-Jürgen Syberberg – Hitler – ein Film aus Deutschland AKA Hitler: A Film from Germany (1978)

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The third and longest part of Syberberg’s extraordinary trilogy on German culture, history and nationalism (the two earlier films were Ludwig – Requiem for a Virgin King and Karl May), best described as a high camp, heavy-duty analysis of both history and historical analysis itself. The chosen method is to single out, act out, alter, and finally comment on the lives of a handful of ‘awkward’ German historical figures, from Ludwig of Bavaria through fantasy author Karl May to Hitler, the ‘madman’. Behind aesthetic complexity lies a simple purpose: to show up the sort of historical contradictions solved by Marxists with bare economic models, and by others with suspect reference to the ‘greatness’ or ‘madness’ of the figures involved. Visually lyrical, the style is eclectic to the point of hysteria; and the tone oscillates between the operatic (Wagner figures large) and the colloquial (Hitler in conversation with his projectionist) without ever quite coming unstuck. Humour mixes with mythology and analysis in the attempt to reunite art, history and ideology. It’s a quite remarkable film, with a sense of metaphor equal to its intellectual courage. Read More »