Tag Archives: Irina Kupchenko

Vadim Abdrashitov – Povorot (1979)

Victor and Natasha drive back to Moscow after a good honeymoon trip by the Black Sea. Already nearing home, Victor hits an elderly lady while driving too fast. All of a sudden, their plans for a good life together are in doubt. Victor is going to face trial, may go to prison.

To start with, the situation seems to him just ridiculous and sad. They are so young and bright. Their whole life is ahead of them. The lady that was hit by Victor was old, probably half blind and careless in the street. Surely the old lady is more to blame for her own death than Victor, isn’t she? Why did this have to happen precisely to him? Should he accept the blame for the accident and thus risk long-term prison, and the end of his career and marital prospects? Does he have to pay for it or not? Should he not escape, somehow? What is the point of self-sacrifice in such a situation? The film also shows a clash between the young and the old, the bright and the ordinary, the haves and the have nots. Read More »

Andrey Konchalovskiy – Dvoryanskoe gnezdo AKA A Nest of Gentry (1969)

A screen adaptation of the novel of the same name by Russian writer Ivan Turgenev. The film portrays the life of Russian landed gentry in the 1840s. After a long travel in Europe, nobleman Lavretsky returns back home. Everything in his estate is so familiar and dear to his heart. On his first visit to his neighbors, the Kalitins, he meets Lisa. He forgets his wife, left in Paris, forgets all his past. He desires only one thing – to always be with Lisa who is so unlike the women he used to know. Read More »

Andrey Konchalovskiy – Dyadya Vanya AKA Uncle Vanya (1970)

A retired professor has returned to his estate to live with his beautiful young wife, Yelena. The estate originally belonged to his first wife, now deceased; her mother and brother still live there and manage the farm. For many years the brother (Uncle Vanya) has sent the farm’s proceeds to the professor, while receiving only a small salary himself. Sonya, the professor’s daughter, who is about the same age as his new wife, also lives on the estate. The professor is pompous, vain, and irritable. He calls the doctor (Astrov) to treat his gout, only to send him away without seeing him. Astrov is an experienced physician who performs his job conscientiously, but has lost all idealism and spends much of his time drinking. The presence of Yelena introduces a bit of sexual tension into the household. Astrov and Uncle Vanya both fall in love with Yelena; she spurns them both. Meanwhile, Sonya is in love with Astrov, who fails even to notice her. Finally, when the professor announces he wants to sell the estate, Vanya, whose admiration for the man died with his sister, tries to kill him. Read More »