Tag Archives: Italian

Alessandro Blasetti – Ettore Fieramosca (1938)

Freely excerpted from Wikipedia:
In 1503, the French and the Spanish fight over the region surrounding the Sicilian castle of Morreale. Giovanna, the beautiful castellan, yearns to free herself from the foreign yoke and for this she wants to marry a brave knight. Graiano d’Asti deceives her by letting Ettore Fieramosca fight in his place and then bragging with Giovanna about the feat, thus managing to convince her to marry him. Read More »

Augusto Tretti – Il Potere (1971)

Review by Ennio Flaiano (L’Espresso, November 14th 1971)
In the scaffolds of Italian cinematography, there’s Augusto Tretti, with his two films, «La legge della tromba» and «Il potere» (two films in two years, the first one barely seen by anyone other than close friends), very hard to place in the landscape. Should be left alone. It will either be an isolated phenomenon, or worse, one that needs to be isolated. He will perhaps, in this country of people who find their ways, copycats, but surely bad ones or just clever ones. Tretti has a gift, his simplicity, which cannot be copied, it implies the superb innocence of the hermit. It’s a simplicity that brings the photographic image to the likes of Nadar, of Daguerre, and also to neo-realism […]. Read More »

Dario Argento – La sindrome di Stendhal (1996)

Anna Manni is a policewoman trying to capture a vicious serial rapist and killer. The problem is that she suffers from Stendhal’s syndrome, a psychosomatic disease that gives her dizziness and hallucinations when she is exposed to the sight of paintings and artistic masterpieces. When the maniac lures her into a trap inside Florence’s famous Uffizi museum, her troubles are just beginning… Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Operai, contadini AKA Workers, Peasants (2001)

Quote:
A peasant tradition of making homemade ricotta cheese on a wood-burning fire becomes an act of resistance in this unforgettable film. Amateur actors from the regional Buti theater, many of them ordinary laborers and farmers, recite or read passages from Elio Vittorini’s Marxist novella Women of Messina, their singularly musical voices ringing out as one in the verdant forest. The story, which Italo Calvino called a “choral narrative,” centers on a group of workers and peasants who rebuild their lives in the aftermath of the Second World War by rebuilding a destroyed village and forming a utopian community. Read More »

Franco Castellano & Giuseppe Moccia – Il bisbetico domato AKA The Taming of the Scoundrel (1980)

A grouchy farmer, known around his small Italian town as being wonderful to his employees, but actively driving everyone else away, is in for a surprise when a beautiful girl from the city, ends up on his stoop after her car breaks down in the rain. Read More »

Damiano Damiani – La moglie più bella AKA The Most Beautiful Wife (1970)

Quote:
Based on the story of Franca Villa and Filippo Melodia. In Sicily, as a Mafia boss leaves for prison, he advises Vito, a young man who’s his potential successor, to marry a virtuous and poor woman. Vito’s eye settles on Francesca, only 15, but lovely and self-possessed. Among her virtues are high self worth and forthright speech, so although she falls in love with Vito, she won’t bow down to him. Believing he’s losing face, he has his boys kidnap her and he rapes her. Then, he tells her he’ll still marry her. Instead, she files charges. Her parents, brother, and neighbors refuse to support her. Will she break? Will Vito continue his assaults? Read More »

Anna Maria Tatò – Marcello Mastroianni: mi ricordo, sì, io mi ricordo AKA Marcello Mastroianni: I Remember [Full version + extras] (1997)

Synopsis:
In 1996, Marcello Mastroianni talks about life as an actor. It’s an anecdotal and philosophical memoir, moving from topic to topic, fully conscious of a man ^Óof a certain age^Ô looking back. He tells stories about Fellini and De Sica’s direction, of using irony in performances, of constantly working (an actor tries to find himself in characters). He’s diffident about prizes, celebrates Rome and Paris, salutes Naples and its people. He answers the question, why make bad films; recalls his father and grandfather, carpenters, his mother, deaf in her old age, and his brother, a film editor; he’s modest about his looks. In repose, time’s swift passage holds Mastroianni inward gaze. Read More »