Tag Archives: James Mason

John Guillermin – The Blue Max (1966)

Synopsis:
Lt. Bruno Stachel (George Peppard), a brash German World War I fighter pilot, is driven to shoot down 20 enemy planes, thus garnering him the Blue Max, a coveted medal. His superior, Count von Klugermann (James Mason), is aware that Bruno will stop at nothing to receive the honor, and admires his tenacity. The count’s nephew, Willi (Jeremy Kemp), is Bruno’s main competition for the prize, but Bruno is determined to eliminate his adversary and secure the honor for himself. Read More »

Jack Clayton – The Pumpkin Eater (1964)

Synopsis:
Film screenwriter Jake Armitage and his wife Jo Armitage live in London with six of Jo’s eight children, with the two eldest boys at boarding school. The children are spread over Jo’s three marriages, with only the youngest being Jake’s biological child, although he treats them all as his own. Jo left her second husband Giles after meeting Giles’ friend Jake, the two who were immediately attracted to each other. Their upper middle class life is much different than Giles and Jo’s, who lived in a barn in the English countryside. But Jo is ruminating about her strained marriage to Jake, with issues on both sides. Read More »

Alan Bridges – The Shooting Party (1985)

Quote:
At last, the British film classic The Shooting Party receives the digital restoration that does justice to its sweeping vistas and heartbreaking snapshots of an era in its death throes. Set in 1913 England, on the brink of what would be the war to end all wars, the film focuses on an assortment of upper-crust acquaintances who gather for a weekend of hunting and society niceties (billiards, cards, draping oneself in jewels the evening after stomping around all day in the muck). Presiding over the festivities is a masterful James Mason as Sir Randolph Nettleby, a sort of benevolent dictator of his breathtaking estate, as his family and friends dip in and out of the action, adhering to the strict code of class conduct for all of their affairs–sport, self-advancement, illicit love. Read More »

Richard Fleischer – 20000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)

A ship sent to investigate a wave of mysterious sinkings encounters the advanced submarine, the Nautilus, commanded by Captain Nemo. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – North by Northwest (1959)

Synopsis:
Madison Avenue advertising man Roger Thornhill finds himself thrust into the world of spies when he is mistaken for a man by the name of George Kaplan. Foreign spy Philip Vandamm and his henchman Leonard try to eliminate him but when Thornhill tries to make sense of the case, he is framed for murder. Now on the run from the police, he manages to board the 20th Century Limited bound for Chicago where he meets a beautiful blond, Eve Kendall, who helps him to evade the authorities. His world is turned upside down yet again when he learns that Eve isn’t the innocent bystander he thought she was. Not all is as it seems however, leading to a dramatic rescue and escape at the top of Mt. Rushmore. Read More »

Henry Hathaway – Prince Valiant (1954)

Synopsis:
Young Prince Valiant, son of the exiled King of Scandia, journeys to Camelot to become a knight at King Arthur’s Round Table. He hopes to help his father reclaim his throne from the pagan Viking usurper Sligon and restore the Christian faith to their homeland. On his journey he stumbles upon a mysterious Black Knight plotting with Sligon’s representatives to overthrow Arthur. Barely escaping with his life, Valiant encounters Sir Gawain, one of the most illustrious knights of the Round Table, and an old friend of his father’s, who tutors the young Viking in the skills needed to be a knight. Valiant and Gawain’s pupil-mentor relationship is complicated by their romantic involvement with Princess Aleta and her sister Ilene, daughters of the King of Ord. If Valiant is to restore his father’s throne and prevent the coup d’etat against Arthur, he must uncover the true identity of the Black Knight. Read More »

Max Ophüls – The Reckless Moment (1949)

Quote:
When the opening titles credit a film as adapted from a short story in the Woman s Home Journal, you know you re onto a good thing. The Reckless Moment doesn t disappoint. Max Ophuls last American film is a women s picture in the grand tradition of Mildred Pierce (1945) – dark edged and melodramatic, and dripping with moral ambiguities. Read More »