Tag Archives: James Woods

Sofia Coppola – The Virgin Suicides [+extras] (1999)

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A group of male friends become obsessed with five mysterious sisters who are sheltered by their strict, religious parents in suburban Detroit in the mid 1970s. Read More »

Jason Alexander – For Better or Worse (1995)

A romantic comedy about Michael (Jason Alexander TV’s “Seinfeld”), a loser whose recent girlfriend dumped him and to make matters worse, he discovers that his recently married brother Reggie (James Woods “John Q,” “Scary Movie 2”) is planning to knock over the credit union where their own mother (Bea Arthur TV’s “The Golden Girls”) works. When it’s discovered that the security codes needed to pull off the heist are in the suitcase of the recent bride (Lolita Davidovitch “Play It to the Bone,” “Mystery, Alaska”), Michael helps her escape and the chase is on! Also starring Oscar-nominee Rob Reiner Read More »

David Cronenberg – Videodrome (1983)

“Television is reality and reality is less than television.” Brian O’Blivion (Jack Creley) in Videodrome.

Max Renn (James Woods) runs a sleazy Toronto cable station that airs softcore porn and bizarre, violent entertainment. When a station techie begins receiving pirated signals of a disturbing sadomasochistic program called “Videodrome,” Renn decides that it would make the perfect addition to his line up. While appearing as a guest on a cable talk show, Renn meets relationship expert Nicki Brand (Deborah Harry). The two of them are immediately drawn to each other, both sharing a penchant for rough sex and, naturally, Betamax dupes of “Videodrome.” When it’s discovered that the pirated signal originates from somewhere in Pittsburgh, television producer Masha (Lynn Gorman) attempts to help Renn secure the rights for his station. She discovers that local television guru Brian O’Blivion (Jack Creley) is behind the violent show and that the behind-the-scenes machinations are of a deeply sinister and complex nature. Against Masha’s advice, Renn seeks out the elusive O’Blivion just as his obsession with the show begins to affect his own reality. Bizarre hallucinations melding his body and the video image begin to plague him. As a vast (yet increasingly personal) conspiracy behind “Videodrome” is slowly revealed, Renn begins a profoundly disturbing transformation into “the new flesh.”

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