Tag Archives: Jean-Claude Brisseau

Jean-Claude Brisseau – À l’aventure (2009)

Quote:
In cinematic enfant terrible Jean-Claude Brisseau’s latest outing, “A l’aventure,” the explicit eroticism of his recent oeuvre topples over into outright porn — not because of graphic sex scenes, but rather due to a plot of unalloyed ludicrousness. Granted, levitating 14th-century Flemish nuns rep an inventive step up from randy milkmen, but Brisseau’s humorless intellectual pretentions founder in very shallow waters. Skedded for an April 1 release in France, pic was pre-bought by IFC Stateside, where its Playboy-ish presentation of elegantly writhing naked women brought to ultimate orgasm, combined with disquisitions on the more cosmological Big Bang Theory, might attract horny eggheads. Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – La croisée des chemins (1976)

The peregrinations of a group of boys and girls from Paris. Two girls swap the capital for the countryside near Montpellier. One of the girls hesitates between dream world and reality.La croisée des chemins marks the start of a significant oeuvre and is a film in which reality and dream are mixed. Jean-Claude Brisseau shot this film on Super8 in 1975. Screened in Studio 43 in Paris, the film was noticed and admired by Eric Rohmer, who attached the name of his production company Les Films du Losange to several films by Brisseau: Un jeu brutal, De bruit et de fureur en Noce blanche. Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – Mort dans l’après-midi (1968)

Quote:
Lisa Heredia, la veuve et la monteuse de Jean-Claude Brisseau, nous a confié ces films. Ce sont ses tout premiers essais, qu’il a montrés quelques années plus tard à Eric Rohmer, qui en fut enthousiasmé et qu’il l’a introduit auprès [de la maison de production] des Films du Losange. Comme il est pour l’instant peu probable que la société nous permette de reprogrammer la rétrospective qui aurait dû lui être consacrée, nous avons jugé de notre devoir de montrer ces films sur notre plate-forme pour compléter la connaissance qui est due à tout grand cinéaste. (Frédéric Bonnaud, Le Monde) Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – Des jeunes femmes disparaissent (1972 – 2014)

The three versions and a film about by JCB.
— Des jeunes femmes disparaissent (1974, 20 minutes, 8 mm, NB) IMDb
— Des jeunes femmes disparaissent (1976, 20 minutes, S8 mm, couleur) IMDb
— Des jeunes femmes disparaissent (2014, 30 minutes, HD, couleur) IMDb
— Des jeunes femmes disparaissent – Origine et fabrication (2018, 30 minutes)

Quote:
Je savais depuis un moment que je devais faire quelque chose que je voulais totalement différent. Récemment, je me suis mis à regarder une série de films en relief. J’ai alors eu envie de faire le remake d’un film, Des jeunes femmes disparaissent, que j’ai tourné il y a 40 ans, d’abord en 8 mm puis en Super 8. C’était un film à suspense, en noir et blanc, qui avait foutu la trouille à Eric Rohmer et Maurice Pialat. Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – Dimanche après-midi (1966-1967)

Quote:
Lisa Heredia, la veuve et la monteuse de Jean-Claude Brisseau, nous a confié ces films. Ce sont ses tout premiers essais, qu’il a montrés quelques années plus tard à Eric Rohmer, qui en fut enthousiasmé et qu’il l’a introduit auprès [de la maison de production] des Films du Losange. Comme il est pour l’instant peu probable que la société nous permette de reprogrammer la rétrospective qui aurait dû lui être consacrée, nous avons jugé de notre devoir de montrer ces films sur notre plate-forme pour compléter la connaissance qui est due à tout grand cinéaste. (Frédéric Bonnaud, Le Monde) . Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – Céline (1992)

Quote:
Genevieve, the village nurse, finds Celine, a confused girl with suicidal tendencies, wandering the ward of the hospital one morning. Genevieve takes the young girl home but is afraid to leave her alone. When Celine’s stepmother offers the nurse money to take care of her stepdaughter, Genevieve agrees. A bond forms between the young girl and older woman until one day Genevieve realizes Celine has uncanny healing powers. With its dream-like cinematography and haunting music, Jean-Claude Brisseau’s psychological drama is a lyrical tale of miracles, apparitions, and sainthood. Brisseau, a maverick director unafraid to tackle social and cultural issues, combines naturalism and surrealism in his own distinctive style. Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – La vie comme ça AKA Life the Way It Is (1978)

Quote:
The second film by Jean-Claude Brisseau is this gritty story of working women in the modern world. Originally shot on 16mm for French television, Life the Way It Is (La Vie Comme Ca) may be the director’s most radical film, with its images of suicide, group violence, and sexual pressure. Agnes Tessier leaves the comfortable confines of school to work at a chemical factory in a slum district with her friend Florence. When greeted with sexual harassment, harsh conditions, and volatile coworkers, Agnes responds by applying for the union rep position in order to challenge the status quo at the factory. Stripped down to the essentials, the film reflects the fury of working-class women everywhere. Read More »