Tag Archives: Jean-Claude Guiguet

Jean-Claude Guiguet – Les passagers [+Extra] (1999)

Synopsis:
The thoughts and dreams of a group of people riding a subway in Paris provides the springboard for Jean-Claude Guiguet’s drama Les Passagers/The Passengers. As the train rolls along, various characters either talk among themselves or address the camera on a variety of subjects. A mathematician (Bruno Putzulu) speaks with one of his students (Stephane Rideau) about the statistical implications of the spread of AIDS. A nurse (Fabienne Babe) meets with a security guard she’s infatuated with (Philippe Garziano), while her friend enjoys a daydream about the joys of life as a rural housewife. A man rants about problems with sex and the virtues of masturbation, while another person debates the relative merits of the films Savage Nights and The Mother and The Whore. Les Passagers/The Passengers was screened as part of the “Un Certain Regard” series at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival.

~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide Read More »

Jean-Claude Guiguet – Faubourg St Martin (1986)

Synopsis:
Imagine a slightly dilapidated three star hotel in the tenth arrondissement run by a very distinguished lady with moral fibre and panache, Mrs. Coppercage. Alongside tourists visiting Paris, Mrs. Coppercage rents three rooms to three women at a monthly rate. Each woman is marked by life, yet they go on as best they can, never closing their eyes to the world around them, or to the men who impatiently await them. Faubourg Saint Martin opens as a love story and ends like a song as shots ring out and punctuate the chorus. Read More »

Jean-Claude Guiguet – Le mirage (1992)

Synopsis:
With the natural splendour of Lac Léman as a back-drop, Le Mirage is the story of a woman who believes she can recapture her youth by rediscovering love… with no regard for the inescapable realities of life. Maria Tummler, still quite beautiful despite her fifty years, is suddenly possessed with a consuming passion for a young visiting American, a friend of her son. But neither Jeanne, her friend, nor Anna, her daughter and faithful confidante, have a right to know, even though the young girl can see the emotion in her mother’s eyes and is delighted to witness the physical transformation seemingly taking place. Maria is prepared to live this miracle of resuscitated love to its very end, even as some signs of a strange physical weariness begin to invade her new-found sense of well-being. Read More »