Tag Archives: Jean Seberg

Philippe Garrel – Les hautes solitudes (1974)

Quote:
“Les Hautes solitudes is a silent, black and white study primarily of three women – Nico, Tina Aumont and, especially, Jean Seberg – and the nature of performance (a man, Laurent Terzieff, also fleetingly appears). In a series of close up images of heart stopping beauty, the sort that bring to mind Jean Renoir’s claim that it was the power of the close-ups of actresses in the cinema of the ’20s that made him want to make films, Aumont and Seberg improvise psychodramas.” – Maximilian Le Cain Read More »

Robert Rossen – Lilith (1964)

Quote:
Lilith is a about a mysterious young woman in an elite sanitarium in New England, who seems to weave a magical spell all around her. A restless, but sincere young man with an equally obscure past is seemingly drawn into her web. As time passes, their relationship deepens and intensifies, and the differences between them begin to blur, leading to a shocking, but oddly logical conclusion. Read More »

Anne Andreu – Éternelle Jean Seberg (2014)

The life of Jean Seberg, through unpublished testimonies: her son, Diego Gary, her sister Mary Ann, Clint Eastwood, who was her partner. The American actress, the iconic short-haired girl from A bout de souffle, reveals herself to be a passionate, militant, but also secretive and fragile woman. Her tragic ending contributes to her almost mythical aura. Read More »

Robert Parrish – In the French Style (1963)

Synopsis:
‘After coming to Paris to study art for a year, mid-westerner Christina James (Jean Seberg) ends up staying for four. Although she came to pursue art, she ends up learning more about herself and love. Amid the city’s romantic atmosphere, she gets involved with a young student (Philippe Forquet) who proves too immature to truly love her. She then finds herself less of an artist and more a member of the artistic scene as she pursues a modeling career. She quickly becomes a “Citizen of Paris,” and embraces its endless parties and jaded view of love. Finally, after falling for a foreign correspondent, Walter Beddoes (Stanley Baker), who loves his career more than her, Christina must make a choice between doomed romance and the safe confines of a marriage to an American who adores her.’
– Warner Archive Read More »

Jean Valère – Les grandes personnes AKA Time Out for Love (1961)

Quote:
Teetering on the one-dimensional, this romantic drama about the coming of age of a nineteen-year-old American woman in Paris is fairly straightforward. Ann (Jean Seberg) arrives in the city of light to visit her uncle, a doctor. But she soon finds herself taking care of a professional woman who is recovering from a suicide attempt and a broken heart. Ann slowly builds up a hatred for the man who drove her charge into such a desperate state but then begins to waver after contact with him. Aside from this association, she meets a different crowd than the one she knew back home in Nebraska, and changes in her attitude, dress, and hairstyle are the result. These alterations only lead her into trouble, as she starts an affair with the very man she had hated earlier. (Allmovie) Read More »

Fabien Collin & François Moreuil – La récréation AKA Playtime (1961)

Synopsis:
‘Kate, an American at a Parisian boarding school, faces the moral and ethical choices of adulthood. Looking over the wall of her school, she becomes fascinated with a sculptor next door, and she begins a flirtation. Although he needs little encouragement, his mistress urges him to seduce the lass and contrives to leave the two together. The same week this cat-and-mouse game begins, Kate witnesses an early morning hit and run road accident in which a soldier is killed. She doesn’t see the car’s driver, whom we know to be the sculptor, but the car is distinctive. What will she do when she finds out he was the driver? Will she call off the affair and call in the cops?’
– jhailey Read More »

Mark Rappaport – From the Journals of Jean Seberg (1995)

Mark Rappaport’s creative bio-pic about actress Jean Seberg is presented in a first-person, autobiographical format (with Seberg played by Mary Beth Hurt). He seamlessly interweaves cinema, politics, American society and culture, and film theory to inform, entertain, and move the viewer. Seberg’s many marriages, as well as her film roles, are discussed extensively. Her involvement with the Black Panther Movement and subsequent investigation by the FBI is covered. Notably, details of French New Wave cinema, Russian Expressionist (silent) films, and the careers of Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave, and Clint Eastwood are also intensively examined. Much of the film is based on conjecture, but Rappaport encourages viewers to re-examine their ideas about women in film with this thought-provoking picture. Read More »