Tag Archives: John Berger

John Berger and Michael Silverblatt – Conversations 1 and 2 (2002)

John Berger is a storyteller, essayist, novelist, screenwriter, dramatist and critic, whose body of work embodies his concern for, in Geoff Dyer’s words, “the enduring mystery of great art and the lived experience of the oppressed.”

He is one of the most internationally influential writers of the last fifty years, who has explored the relationships between the individual and society, culture and politics and experience and expression in a series of novels, book works, essays, plays, films, photographic collaborations and performances, unmatched in their diversity, ambition and reach. His television series and book Ways of Seeing revolutionized the way that Fine Art is read and understood, while his engagement with European peasantry and migration in the fiction trilogy Into Their Labours and A Seventh Man stand as models of empathy and insight.

John Berger in conversation with Michael Silverblatt at Berger’s home, a working farm, in Quincy, Mieussy, France, October 2002. Silverblatt is the host of the radio interview program, Bookworm. Read More »

John Berger and Noam Chomsky – Times of Crisis (2014)

Exclusive material from writer, artist, critic John Berger and a virtual response and conversation with Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics and Philosophy at MIT. This event took place at Dartmouth College as part of GRID’s 2014 Spring Public Lecture Series: Times of Crisis

Note, Berger’s material is audio only and is accompanied by still images, and Chomsky is on a live video link in this session. Read More »

Alain Tanner – Une ville à Chandigarh aka A City at Chandigarh (1966)


29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

When, in 1947, a portion of Punjab province was assigned to the newly created
Pakistani State, Albert Mayer began planning a new capital for the portion which
remained in the possession of India. Le Corbusier had been responsible since the
1950s for general planning and, more particularly, for large-scale buildings typical
of the governmental sector. A year after the death of Le Corbusier, Alain Tanner
began shooting his film in a city still partially under construction, or even, in certain
places, at the planning stage. The inhabitants of the metropolis, however, already
numbered some 120,000. Read More »