Tag Archives: Juliet Berto

Juliet Berto & Jean-Henri Roger – Neige AKA Snow [+Extra] (1981)

Quote:
An illustration of the more or less weird people in the nightlife of the revel region of a French town. In the center of the (almost non-existing) plot are barmaid Anita and a reverend. Anita cares for the Caribbean dealer Bobby like a mother, but he’s too cool to listen to her warnings. When he’s caught by the police, Anita has pity for her friends who are without “neige” (snow, probably cocaine) now, and tries to help them out. Read More »

Delphine Seyrig – Sois belle et tais-toi AKA Be Pretty and Shut Up (1981)

Famous actresses talk about their role in the movie industry, and the demand to “be beautiful and shut up”. Read More »

Claude Miller – Camille ou La comédie catastrophique (1971)

Camille invites some soldiers to spend a Sunday in the country with her. When they arrive, they find that something is amiss. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – La chinoise [+commentary] (1967)

Synopsis:
Born in a decade of political turmoil, La Chinoise has become a cinematic marker for the significant historical events that surrounded its creation. Five Parisian students, their political awareness aroused by Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book and the Chinese Cultural Revolution, envision an overthrow of Western governmental systems – which they aim to bring about through acts of terrorism. One of Godard’s most brilliant films of the 60s, its success lies in the rejection of traditional narrative techniques: it is a dialectical charade which is as disturbing as it is comical. Though criticised in its day as a political manipulation, La Chinoise has proven alarmingly prophetic and its impact on audiences during the late 60s is echoed amongst viewers today. Read More »

Claude Miller – Juliet dans Paris (1967)

A young student, alone in Paris, is engaged in strange and bloody experiences of which she is both the authorizer and the victim. Read More »

Groupe Dziga Vertov & Jean-Luc Godard & Jean-Pierre Gorin – Vladimir et Rosa (1971)

Quote:

Vladimir and Rosa was in many ways the last true product of the experimental revolutionary filmmaking cooperative the Dziga Vertov Group: the final film produced under the group’s banner before Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin went on to make the feature Tout va bien and the short Letter To Jane under their own names, before parting ways for good. Taking its title from Vladimir Lenin and Rosa Luxemburg, this film is typical of Godard and Gorin’s late 60s/early 70s collaborations. That is to say, it’s shrill, antagonistic, messy and often intentionally grating, as dense and complex as it is difficult and polemical. Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Les ministères de l’art (1989)


Documentary on post-Nouvelle Vague directors with Benoît Jacquot, André Téchiné, Jacques Doillon, Chantal Akerman, Werner Schroeter, Juliette Berto, Leos Carax and footage of Jean Eustache.
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