Tag Archives: Kim Hunter

William Castle – When Strangers Marry AKA Betrayed (1944)

The noir city in all its desperate foreboding: a dancing sign flashes in an angel’s face. An angel innocent and afraid yet ventures into the seething labyrinth with a stranger, her husband, running from capture into the city of entrapment.

You trust no-one, fear the worst, and blunder from one dead-end into another. Dark faces and sharp dressers in sinister doorways. Share a cab with a bawling waif, a dying woman on borrowed time, and a suspicious driver. Stop! Get out! Onto dark streets, smoke-filled dives, cafés on the edge of purgatory, and hellish rooms for rent. A young girl in pig-tails as likely to betray you as the mother with arms folded in menace then her cold hand out for payment in advance. Nowhere left to run. The rented room a cell you can’t leave. Read More »

Mark Robson – The Seventh Victim (1943)

Chicago Film Society writes:
Tasked with heading up RKO’s horror unit from 1942 to 1946, producer and screenwriter Val Lewton was responsible for one of the most extraordinary runs of films to ever come out of classic Hollywood. Given modest budgets, lurid titles, and a running-time cap of 75 minutes by his superiors, Lewton, along with up-and-coming directors Mark Robson, Jacques Tourneur, and Robert Wise, produced a string of bewitching, ethereal masterpieces and developed a house style defined by expressive shadows, pervasive melancholy, somnambulism, and ambient dread. One of Lewton’s crowning achievements, The Seventh Victim broke from horror conventions of its time and found darkness lurking not in the vampires and monsters of the old world but in good ol’ American sham psychoanalytics and success-centered occultism. Read More »