Tag Archives: Laurence Olivier

George Cukor – Love Among the Ruins (1975)

Love Among the Ruins tells the story of Jessica Medlicott (Hepburn), a wealthy, widowed actress who becomes romantically involved with a fortune-hunting young man named Alfred Pratt (Leigh Lawson). When the scheming Alfred sues Jessica for breach of promise (this means not honouring a proposal of marriage), she is forced to hire legendary barrister Sir Arthur Granville-Jones (Olivier) to defend her. Although Jessica doesn’t remember it, she and Sir Arthur had a brief love affair several decades ago, and the attorney has carried a torch for her ever since. Read More »

Tim Whelan – The Divorce of Lady X (1938)

crescentblues.com wrote:
Were women ever inferior to men? The Divorce of Lady X insists that females possess superior intellect to compensate for any lack of physical strength when dealing with the larger, if not the smarter, of the species. Five characters, including two couples, find themselves star-crossed, racing ’round London to set marriage right in this romantic comedy. Who could be more heart-pounding than a young Olivier, his career flying out the window as he pursues a judge’s grand-daughter? The judge, of course, identifies with the hero, who makes as much of a buffoon of himself as the girl’s grandfather probably once did. Laughter abounds in this film to such an extent that even the music sounds funny. Read More »

Various – The World at War (1973)

Quote:
When this epic series was first broadcast in 1973 it redefined the gold standard for television documentary; it remains the benchmark by which all factual programming must judge itself.

Originally shown as 26 one-hour programmes, The World at War set out to tell the story of the Second World War through the testimony of key participants. The result is a unique and unrepeatable event, since many of the eyewitnesses captured on film did not have long left to live. Each hour-long programme is carefully structured to focus on a key theme or campaign, from the rise of Nazi Germany to Hitler’s downfall and the onset of the Cold War. Read More »

Joseph L. Mankiewicz – Sleuth (1972)

Synopsis :
A man who loves games and theater invites his wife’s lover to meet him, setting up a battle of wits with potentially deadly results. Read More »

Franco Zeffirelli – Jesus of Nazareth (1977)

From awarded director Franco Zefirelli has been brought to screen this wonderful depiction of the greatest story ever to be told: the life of Jesus Of Nazareth, God became man. The One who came to earth to feed our faith; from the annunciation of archangel Gabriel to holy Mary, until the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, this narration reminds us of the greatness of a men who changed the world and granted light to mankind, light that presently lights up all of its pathways. Read More »

Cyril Gardner – Perfect Understanding (1933)

Gloria Swanson co-produced Perfect Understanding, a romantic comedy that teamed her with a young Laurence Olivier. A young American woman (Swanson), on vacation in England, meets an aristocrat (Olivier) and the two fall passionately in love. Seeing how other couples become possessive and implode in marriage, they make a pact: they’ll marry, but they’ll keep the arrangement light and loose. But can two young lovers really carry on carefree, committed to not belonging to each other? Read More »

Derek Jarman – War Requiem (1989)

War Requiem is a 1989 film adaptation of Benjamin Britten’s musical piece of the same name.

It was shot in 1988 by the British film director Derek Jarman with the 1963 recording as the soundtrack, produced by Don Boyd and financed by the BBC. Decca Records required that the 1963 recording be heard on its own, with no overlaid soundtrack or other sound effects. The film featured Nathaniel Parker as Wilfred Owen, and Laurence Olivier in his last acting appearance in any medium before his death in July 1989. The film is structured as the reminiscences of Olivier’s character, the Old Soldier in a wheelchair, and Olivier recites “Strange Meeting” in the film’s prologue. Read More »