Leslie Banks

  • Anthony Asquith – Cottage to Let AKA Bombsight Stolen (1941)

    Anthony Asquith1941-1950ThrillerUnited KingdomWar
    Cottage to Let (1941)
    Cottage to Let (1941)

    Cottage to Let is a taut British wartime spy thriller, laced with moments of genuinely hilarious comedy. The “maguffin” in this instance is a revolutionary new bombsight, designed by inventor John Barrington (Leslie Banks). A group of Nazi spies intend to steal the blueprints for the invention (hence the film’s alternate title Bombsight Stolen), and to that end dispatch one of their top agents (John Mills), who parachutes into the story posing as wounded RAF pilot Lt. Perry. Hailed as a war hero by the gullible locals, Perry rents a cottage from the unsuspecting Barrington and his wife (Jeanne de Casalis). The treacherous Nazi meets his match in the unlikely form of oafish Charles Dimble (Alastair Sim), who turns out to be a British undercover agent.Read More »

  • Anthony Asquith – Cottage to Let AKA Bombsight Stolen (1941) (HD)

    1941-1950Anthony AsquithMysteryThrillerUnited Kingdom

    Plot:
    Upper class Mrs. Barrington (Jeanne de Casalis) takes in two child evacuees from London, including cocky teenager Ronald (George Cole), lodging them in a cottage she owns. However, it has already been let to annoyingly inquisitive Charles Dimble (Alastair Sim). To compound the confusion, Mrs. Barrington had also agreed to allow it to be converted into a military hospital. Spitfire pilot Flight Lieutenant Perry (John Mills) parachutes into the nearby loch and becomes the first patient, tended by Mrs. Barrington’s pretty daughter Helen (Carla Lehmann). Mrs. Barrington moves Ronald to the main house, while Dimble and Perry remain in the cottage.Read More »

  • Laurence Olivier – The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fifth with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France AKA Henry V (1944)

    1941-1950ClassicsDramaLaurence OlivierUnited KingdomWilliam Shakespeare

    Synopsis:
    Laurence Olivier’s adaptation of Henry V is one of the finest Shakespeare films ever made, full of rousing action, beautiful colors and passionate performances. Henry V is the story of the newly crowned king of England who fights the French for possession of Normandy. Olivier’s direction is inventive, beginning the film as if it were a performance at the Globe Theatre, and having it slowly expand so the final battle scenes take place in realistic settings. Released in 1944 during the height of World War II, Henry V didn’t receive an American release until 1946, upon which Olivier won a special Academy Award for “his outstanding achievement as actor, producer and director in bringing Henry V to the screen.”
    — Stephen ErlewineRead More »

  • Alfred Hitchcock – The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

    1931-1940Alfred HitchcockThrillerUnited Kingdom

    Quote:
    Bob (Leslie Banks) and Jill Lawrence (Edna Best) are on a winter sports holiday with their teenage daughter. When their friend Louis Bernard is shot whilst dancing with Jill, he tells Bob of an assassination about to take place in London.

    Fearing that their plot will be revealed, the assassins kidnap their daughter in order to keep the Lawrence’s quiet.
    Bob and Jill return to London and take matters into their own hands.
    In this movie we can beside Leslie Banks and Edna Best also see Peter Lorre.Read More »

  • Thorold Dickinson – The Arsenal Stadium Mystery (1939)

    1931-1940ClassicsMysteryThorold DickinsonUnited Kingdom

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    IMDb user:
    There are several reasons to relish this curio. It was an apprentice work by Thorold Dickinson, the Hitchcock assistant and cutter who would shoot “Gaslight” and “The Queen of Spades” before becoming Britain’s first professor of film. It is one of the earliest sports movies to feature real sportsmen – acting very woodenly, as befits stiff-upper-lip soccer stars. It is anchored by a mischievously eccentric performance by Leslie Banks, who a few years later was to be the magnificent Chorus of Olivier’s “Henry V”.Read More »

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