Tag Archives: Leslie Caron

Norman Lloyd – Carola (1973)

SYNOPSIS:
Originally produced in 1972 as a segment of the television series “Hollywood Television Theatre.”

Legendary filmmaker Jean Renoir’s suspenseful and romantic tale of a beautiful French actress struggling to avoid the deadly politics and forbidden passions of Nazi-occupied France.

During World War II, an acting company in occupied Paris is notified that a German officer will be stopping by to see their play. The stage manager–who also happens to be the lover of Carola, the lead actress–asks her to “play up” to the visiting German for the good of the play, but when the officer arrives, it becomes clear to the manager that the German and Carola have had a previous relationship, and that she is still in love with him. Read More »

Joshua Logan – Fanny (1961)

Quote:
Leslie Caron gets top billing and the lion share of screen time in “Fanny” but Maurice Chevalier steals the show from the first frame. Making its DVD debut, this 1961 film is based on the Tony-Award musical of the same name. Despite getting its start way back in 1954, the story is surprisingly risqué and contemporary, dealing with issues such as illegitimate children, premarital sex, cleavage and adultery. Because of Chevalier and the cast, those issues are presented in a jovial, comedic way until the third act, when the humor and levity the production is built on is jettisoned in favor of mediocre melodrama. Read More »

Ralph Nelson – Father Goose (1964)

Synopsis:
This 1964 Oscar winner for Best Orginal Screenplay stars Cary Grant as a boozy beachcomber during WWII who monitors the radio in the South Pacific in exchange for shipments of alcohol. When lovely and structured French schoolmarm Catherine Freneau (Leslie Caron) crashes onto the island, an immediate and electric fuel ignites between the two polar opposites. Read More »

Vincente Minnelli – Gigi (1958)

Synopsis:
Weary of the conventions of Parisian society, a rich playboy and a youthful courtesan-in-training enjoy a platonic friendship, but it may not stay platonic for long. Gaston, the scion of a wealthy Parisian family finds emotional refuge from the superficial lifestyle of upper class Parisian 1900s society with the former mistress of his uncle and her outgoing, tomboy granddaughter, Gigi. When Gaston becomes aware that Gigi has matured into a woman, her grandmother and aunt, who have educated Gigi to be a wealthy man’s mistress, urge the pair to act out their roles but love adds a surprise twist to this delightful turn-of-the 20th century Cinderella story. Read More »

Vincente Minnelli – An American in Paris (1951)

Synopsis:
Jerry Mulligan, a struggling American painter in Paris, is “discovered” by an influential heiress with an interest in more than Jerry’s art. Jerry in turn falls for Lise, a young French girl already engaged to a cabaret singer. Jerry jokes, sings and dances with his best friend, an acerbic would-be concert pianist, while romantic complications abound. Read More »

Eduardo de Gregorio – Sérail AKA Surreal Estate (1976)

Synopsis:
An English novelist is lured, with disconcerting and disorienting results, into purchasing a crumbling mansion by what he imagines are the deliberately ‘literary’ ploys of its housekeeper (Leslie Caron) and two mysterious, lurking women. Read More »

Edgardo Cozarinsky – Guerriers et captives AKA Guerreros y cautivas (1990)

In 1880, a colonel and his French wife live in a fort in the Patagonian desert. The colonel takes an Amerindian as captive, with the intent to civilize her. A “southern” movie (in opposition to “western”, as it was shot in the deep Argentinean south

Quote:
Dos caras de una misma moneda. Uno viene de lo salvaje hacia la civilización; la otra, desde la civilización hacia la barbarie. Se realiza un cambio de identidad. El guerrero queda impresionado con la civilización romana, y siente que pertenece a aquella. La abuela de Borges quiere rescatar a la india, pero ella la rechaza. Se espanta, no puede creerlo; pero cuando su marido muere, ella se siente identificada. Cuando la india toma la sangre caliente del caballo que acababa de degollar, es cuando termina de demostrar que nunca dejará de ser india, más allá de su lugar de nacimiento. Read More »